WW2 Treasure Hunters pairs Britain's foremost amateur WW2 detectorist with Madness frontman Suggs, as they uncover historical finds from across the UK. Using state-of-the-art technology, original WW2 archives and maps, the pair work together to identify the best places to dig at forgotten sites, including former military bases, airfields, POW camps and barracks. Once located, they then go on to perform extensive digs to excavate the relics.

As the artefacts are unearthed, the presenters turn detective, revealing the stories and people behind the finds. They meet with survivors, experts and historians to understand what happened at each of the locations.

WW2 Treasure Hunters - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-10-09

WW2 Treasure Hunters - Lorelei - Netflix

The Lorelei (; German: Loreley German: [loːʀəˈlaɪ, ˈloːʀəlaɪ]) is a 132 m (433 ft) high, steep slate rock on the right bank of the river Rhine in the Rhine Gorge (or Middle Rhine) at Sankt Goarshausen in Germany.

WW2 Treasure Hunters - Original folklore and modern myth - Netflix

The rock and the murmur it creates have inspired various tales. An old legend envisioned dwarfs living in caves in the rock. In 1801, German author Clemens Brentano composed his ballad Zu Bacharach am Rheine as part of a fragmentary continuation of his novel Godwi oder Das steinerne Bild der Mutter. It first told the story of an enchanting female associated with the rock. In the poem, the beautiful Lore Lay, betrayed by her sweetheart, is accused of bewitching men and causing their death. Rather than sentence her to death, the bishop consigns her to a nunnery. On the way thereto, accompanied by three knights, she comes to the Lorelei rock. She asks permission to climb it and view the Rhine once again. She does so and thinking that she sees her love in the Rhine, falls to her death; the rock still retained an echo of her name afterwards. Brentano had taken inspiration from Ovid and the Echo myth. In 1824, Heinrich Heine seized on and adapted Brentano's theme in one of his most famous poems, “Die Lorelei”. It describes the eponymous female as a sort of siren who, sitting on the cliff above the Rhine and combing her golden hair, unwittingly distracted shipmen with her beauty and song, causing them to crash on the rocks. In 1837 Heine's lyrics were set to music by Friedrich Silcher in the art song “Lorelei” that became well known in German-speaking lands. A setting by Franz Liszt was also favored and dozens of other musicians have set the poem to music. The Lorelei character, although originally imagined by Brentano, passed into German popular culture in the form described in the Heine–Silcher song and is commonly but mistakenly believed to have originated in an old folk tale. The French writer Guillaume Apollinaire took up the theme again in his poem “La Loreley”, from the collection Alcools which is later cited in Symphony No. 14 (3rd movement) of Dmitri Shostakovich.

WW2 Treasure Hunters - References - Netflix