From Cleopatra to Elizabeth I and Sophie Scholl – they're all women from vastly contrasting eras and backgrounds, but with one thing in common: they are some of the most influential women in history. Powerful and helpless, popular and scorned, determined and desperate – each one of them stood out from her peers in some way.\ \ This dramatised series portrays these remarkable women in unprecedented detail, and examines their lives both in a contemporary context as well as from a historical perspective.

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2013-11-23

Women Who Made History - History of bisexuality - Netflix

See also Bisexuality#History, Bisexuality in the United States, and Lists of bisexual people. This is an article about the history of bisexuality. The subject is inherent with systematic bias, of non-heterosexuality being seen as less worthy than heterosexuality, and of women's sexuality being seen as less worthy, even of being depicted, than that of men. Bisexual erasure has taken place in many cultures so that bisexuality is often not acknowledged or interpreted as homosexuality. In many cultures, bisexuals, especially bisexual women, were never thought to exist. Sexuality that was non-heteronormative was often not discussed, and only allowed if absolutely necessary. In many cases, although male and female bisexuality has arguably existed in every culture, researchers are often able to only document occurrences tied to scandals, criminal proceedings, private correspondence, and/or artistic renderings.

Women Who Made History - Ancient Rome - Netflix

It was expected and socially acceptable for a freeborn Roman man to want sex with both female and male partners, as long as he took the penetrative role. See Homosexuality in ancient Rome. The morality of the behavior depended on the social standing of the partner, not his sex per se. Both women and young men were considered normal objects of desire, but outside marriage a man was supposed to act on his desires only with slaves, prostitutes (who were often slaves), and the infames. Sex did not determine whether a man's sexual partner was acceptable, but it was considered immoral to have sex with another freeborn man's wife, his marriageable daughter, his underage son, or with the man himself; sexual use of another man's slave was subject to the owner's permission. Lack of self-control, including in managing one's sex life, indicated that a man was incapable of governing others; too much indulgence in “low sensual pleasure” threatened to erode the elite male's identity as a cultured person.

Women Who Made History - References - Netflix