The story of the 1912 sinking of the largest luxury liner ever built, the tragedy that befell over two thousand of the rich and famous as well as of the poor and unknown passengers aboard the doomed ship.

Titanic - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 90 minutes

Premier: 1996-11-17

Titanic - Titanic (1997 film) - Netflix

Titanic is a 1997 American epic romance-disaster film directed, written, co-produced and co-edited by James Cameron. A fictionalized account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, it stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage. Cameron's inspiration for the film came from his fascination with shipwrecks; he felt a love story interspersed with the human loss would be essential to convey the emotional impact of the disaster. Production began in 1995, when Cameron shot footage of the actual Titanic wreck. The modern scenes on the research vessel were shot on board the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, which Cameron had used as a base when filming the wreck. Scale models, computer-generated imagery, and a reconstruction of the Titanic built at Baja Studios, at Playas de Rosarito in Baja California were used to re-create the sinking. The film was partially funded by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. It was the most expensive film ever made at the time, with a production budget of $200 million. Upon its release on December 19, 1997, Titanic achieved critical and commercial success. Nominated for 14 Academy Awards, it tied All About Eve (1950) for the most Oscar nominations, and won 11, including the awards for Best Picture and Best Director, tying Ben-Hur (1959) for the most Oscars won by a single film. With an initial worldwide gross of over $1.84 billion, Titanic was the first film to reach the billion-dollar mark. It remained the highest-grossing film of all time until Cameron's Avatar surpassed it in 2010. A 3D version of Titanic, released on April 4, 2012 to commemorate the centennial of the sinking, earned it an additional $343.6 million worldwide, pushing the film's worldwide total to $2.18 billion and making it the second film to gross more than $2 billion worldwide (after Avatar). In 2017, the film was re-released for its 20th anniversary and was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

Titanic - Commercial analysis - Netflix

Before Titanic's release, various film critics predicted the film would be a significant disappointment at the box office, especially due to it being the most expensive film ever made at the time. When it was shown to the press in autumn of 1997, “it was with massive forebodings” since the “people in charge of the screenings believed they were on the verge of losing their jobs – because of this great albatross of a picture on which, finally, two studios had to combine to share the great load of its making”. Cameron also thought he was “headed for disaster” at one point during filming. “We labored the last six months on Titanic in the absolute knowledge that the studio would lose $100 million. It was a certainty,” he stated. As the film neared release, “particular venom was spat at Cameron for what was seen as his hubris and monumental extravagance”. A film critic for the Los Angeles Times wrote that “Cameron's overweening pride has come close to capsizing this project” and that the film was “a hackneyed, completely derivative copy of old Hollywood romances”. When the film became a success, with an unprecedented box office performance, it was credited for being a love story that captured its viewers' emotions. The film was playing on 3,200 screens ten weeks after it opened, and out of its fifteen straight weeks on top of the charts, jumped 43% in total sales in its ninth week of release. It earned over $20 million a week for ten weeks, and after 14 weeks was still bringing in more than $1 million a week. 20th Century Fox estimated that seven percent of American teenage girls had seen Titanic twice by its fifth week. Although young women who saw the film several times, and subsequently caused “Leo-Mania”, were often credited with having primarily propelled the film to its all-time box office record, other reports have attributed the film's success to positive word of mouth and repeat viewership due to the love story combined with the ground-breaking special effects. The film's impact on men has also been especially credited. Now considered one of the films that “make men cry”, MSNBC's Ian Hodder stated that men admire Jack's sense of adventure, stowing away on a steamship bound for America. “We cheer as he courts a girl who was out of his league. We admire how he suggests nude modeling as an excuse to get naked. So when [the tragic ending happens], an uncontrollable flood of tears sinks our composure,” he said. Titanic's ability to make men cry was briefly parodied in the 2009 film Zombieland, where character Tallahassee (Woody Harrelson), when recalling the death of his young son, states: “I haven't cried like that since Titanic.” In 2010, the BBC analyzed the stigma over men crying during Titanic and films in general. “Middle-aged men are not 'supposed' to cry during movies,” stated Finlo Rohrer of the website, citing the ending of Titanic as having generated such tears, adding that “men, if they have felt weepy during [this film], have often tried to be surreptitious about it.” Professor Mary Beth Oliver, of Penn State University, stated, “For many men, there is a great deal of pressure to avoid expression of 'female' emotions like sadness and fear. From a very young age, males are taught that it is inappropriate to cry, and these lessons are often accompanied by a great deal of ridicule when the lessons aren't followed.” Rohrer said, “Indeed, some men who might sneer at the idea of crying during Titanic will readily admit to becoming choked up during Saving Private Ryan or Platoon.” For men in general, “the idea of sacrifice for a 'brother' is a more suitable source of emotion”. Scott Meslow of The Atlantic stated while Titanic initially seems to need no defense, given its success, it is considered a film “for 15-year-old girls” by its main detractors. He argued that dismissing Titanic as fodder for 15-year-old girls fails to consider the film's accomplishment: “that [this] grandiose, 3+ hour historical romantic drama is a film for everyone—including teenage boys.” Meslow stated that despite the film being ranked high by males under the age of 18, matching the ratings for teenage boy-targeted films like Iron Man, it is common for boys and men to deny liking Titanic. He acknowledged his own rejection of the film as a child while secretly loving it. “It's this collection of elements—the history, the romance, the action—that made (and continues to make) Titanic an irresistible proposition for audiences of all ages across the globe,” he stated. “Titanic has flaws, but for all its legacy, it's better than its middlebrow reputation would have you believe. It's a great movie for 15-year-old girls, but that doesn't mean it's not a great movie for everyone else too.” Quotes in the film aided its popularity. Titanic's catchphrase “I'm the king of the world!” became one of the film industry's more popular quotations. According to Richard Harris, a psychology professor at Kansas State University, who studied why people like to cite films in social situations, using film quotations in everyday conversation is similar to telling a joke and a way to form solidarity with others. “People are doing it to feel good about themselves, to make others laugh, to make themselves laugh”, he said. Cameron explained the film's success as having significantly benefited from the experience of sharing. “When people have an experience that's very powerful in the movie theatre, they want to go share it. They want to grab their friend and bring them, so that they can enjoy it,” he said. “They want to be the person to bring them the news that this is something worth having in their life. That's how Titanic worked.” Media Awareness Network stated, “The normal repeat viewing rate for a blockbuster theatrical film is about 5%. The repeat rate for Titanic was over 20%.” The box office receipts “were even more impressive” when factoring in “the film's 3-hour-and-14-minute length meant that it could only be shown three times a day compared to a normal movie's four showings”. In response to this, “[m]any theatres started midnight showings and were rewarded with full houses until almost 3:30 am”. Titanic held the record for box office gross for twelve years. Cameron's follow-up film, Avatar, was considered the first film with a genuine chance at surpassing its worldwide gross, and did so in 2010. Various explanations for why the film was able to successfully challenge Titanic were given. For one, “Two-thirds of Titanic's haul was earned overseas, and Avatar [tracked] similarly... Avatar opened in 106 markets globally and was no. 1 in all of them” and the markets “such as Russia, where Titanic saw modest receipts in 1997 and 1998, are white-hot today” with “more screens and moviegoers” than ever before. Brandon Gray, president of Box Office Mojo, said that while Avatar may beat Titanic's revenue record, the film is unlikely to surpass Titanic in attendance. “Ticket prices were about $3 cheaper in the late 1990s.” In December 2009, Cameron had stated, “I don't think it's realistic to try to topple Titanic off its perch. Some pretty good movies have come out in the last few years. Titanic just struck some kind of chord.” In a January 2010 interview, he gave a different take on the matter once Avatar's performance was easier to predict. “It's gonna happen. It's just a matter of time,” he said. Author Alexandra Keller, when analyzing Titanic's success, stated that scholars could agree that the film's popularity “appears dependent on contemporary culture, on perceptions of history, on patterns of consumerism and globalization, as well as on those elements experienced filmgoers conventionally expect of juggernaut film events in the 1990s – awesome screen spectacle, expansive action, and, more rarely seen, engaging characters and epic drama.”

Titanic - References - Netflix