An intoxicating love story set in England's first department store in the 1870s.

The Paradise - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-09-25

The Paradise - Garden of Eden - Netflix

The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical “garden of God”, described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel. Genesis 13:10 refers to the “garden of God” (not called Eden by name), and the “trees of the garden” are mentioned in Ezekiel 31. The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden. Traditionally, scholars favored deriving the name “Eden” from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word edin meaning “plain” or “steppe”. Chaim Cohen, however, writes that Eden is more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning “fruitful, well-watered”. Another interpretation associates the name “Eden” with a Hebrew word for “pleasure”; thus the Douay-Rheims Bible in Genesis 2:8 has the wording “And the Lord God had planted a paradise of pleasure” (rather than “a garden in Eden”). The Hebrew term is translated “pleasure” in Sarah's secret saying in Genesis 18:12. Like the records of the great flood, the creation story and the account of the confusion of languages, the story of Eden echoes the Mesopotamian myth of a king, as a primordial man, who is placed in a divine garden to guard the Tree of Life. The Hebrew Bible depicts Adam and Eve as walking around the Garden of Eden naked due to their innocence. Eden and its rivers may signify the real Jerusalem, the Temple of Solomon, or the Promised Land. It may also represent the divine garden on Zion, and the mountain of God, which was also Jerusalem. The imagery of the Garden, with its serpent and cherubim, has been compared to the images of the Solomonic Temple with its copper serpent (the nehushtan) and guardian cherubs. According to the Bible, the location of Eden is described in the Book of Genesis, chapter 2, verses 10–14 as the source of four tributaries. However, the Garden of Eden is considered to be mythological by most scholars. Among those that consider it to have been real there have been various suggestions for its location: for example, at the head of the Persian Gulf, in southern Mesopotamia (now Iraq) where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers run into the sea; and in the Armenian Highlands or Armenian Plateau, among other proposed locations.

The Paradise - Ezekiel - Netflix

In Ezekiel 28:12–19 the prophet Ezekiel the “son of man” sets down God's word against the king of Tyre: the king was the “seal of perfection”, adorned with precious stones from the day of his creation, placed by God in the garden of Eden on the holy mountain as a guardian cherub. But the king sinned through wickedness and violence, and so he was driven out of the garden and thrown to the earth, where now he is consumed by God's fire: “All those who knew you in the nations are appalled at you, you have come to a horrible end and will be no more.” (v.19). According to Terje Stordalen, the Eden in Ezekiel appears to be located in Lebanon. “[I]t appears that the Lebanon is an alternative placement in Phoenician myth (as in Ez 28,13, III.48) of the Garden of Eden”, and there are connections between paradise, the garden of Eden and the forests of Lebanon (possibly used symbolically) within prophetic writings. Edward Lipinski and Peter Kyle McCarter have suggested that the Garden of the gods (Sumerian paradise), the oldest Sumerian version of the Garden of Eden, relates to a mountain sanctuary in the Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon ranges.

The Paradise - References - Netflix