The Housing Enforcers is a BBC One day-time television series that first aired on 1 September 2014.

The series is hosted by presenter Matt Allwright and looks at the work of Local Authority Housing Officers who deal with disrepair and other Environmental Health related matters in the private rented housing sector in the UK.

The Housing Enforcers - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 2014-09-01

The Housing Enforcers - United States Department of Housing and Urban Development - Netflix

The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a Cabinet department in the Executive branch of the United States federal government. Although its beginnings were in the House and Home Financing Agency, it was founded as a Cabinet department in 1965, as part of the “Great Society” program of President Lyndon Johnson, to develop and execute policies on housing and metropolises.

The Housing Enforcers - Criticisms - Netflix

A scandal arose in the 1990s when at least 700 houses were sold for profit by real estate speculators taking the loans; at least 19 were arrested. The scandal devastated the Brooklyn and Harlem housing market and with $70 million in HUD loans going into default. Critics said that HUD's lax oversight of their program allowed the fraud to occur. and in 1997, the HUD Inspector General issued a report saying: “The program design encourages risky property deals, land sale and refinance schemes, overstated property appraisals, and phony or excessive fees.” In June 1993, HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros admitted that “HUD has in many cases exacerbated the declining quality of life in America.” In 1996, Vice President Al Gore, referring to public housing projects, declared that, “These crime-infested monuments to a failed policy are killing the neighborhoods around them”. HUD Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing Roberta Achtenberg has been quoted as saying “...HUD walks a tightrope between free speech and fair housing. We are ever mindful of the need to maintain the proper balance between these rights.” Libertarian critic James Bovard commented that, “The more aggressive HUD becomes, the fewer free speech rights Americans have. Many words and phrases are now effectively forbidden in real estate ads. ... Apparently, there are two separate versions of the Bill of Rights -- one for private citizens and the other for federal bureaucrats and politicians”. In 2006, The Village Voice called HUD “New York City's worst landlord” and “the #1 worst in the United States” based upon decrepit conditions of buildings and questionable eviction practices. In September 2010, HUD started auctioning off delinquent home mortgage loans, defined as at least 90 days past due, to the highest bidder. It sold 2,000 loans in six national auctions. In 2012, this sale was massively increased under a “Distressed Asset Stabilization Program” (DASP), and the 100,000 loans sold as of 2014 have netted 8.8 billion for the FHA, rebuilding cash reserves that had been depleted by loan defaults. The second stated and eponymous objective is to stabilize communities, by requiring purchasers to service the loans in a manner that stabilizes the surrounding communities by getting the loans to re-perform, renting the home to the borrower, gifting the property to a land bank or paying off the loans in full. An audit published August 2014 found “only about 11 percent of the loans sold through DASP [were] considered 're-performing'”. “Rather than defaulting— [FHA] keeps many of the properties they’re tied to from going through the typical foreclosure process. As a result, the FHA might actually be diverting housing stock from first-time homebuyers, the very group it was formed to serve...”

The Housing Enforcers - References - Netflix