The South Beach Tow crew returns to the streets of Miami, where the zaniness is in full force from the start. Bernice and her mom kick off their own food truck business, Kosgrove "encounters" the elusive Swamp Ape, and J-Money gets a side-kick who isn't even old enough to drive. From rapping mermaids to angry female body builders to a tiny smart car owner that really "flips" out, there is nothing too bizarre for this tow company. Get ready for a burst of energy that's jam-packed with fun and laughs!

South Beach Tow - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2011-07-20

South Beach Tow - American Horror Story - Netflix

American Horror Story is an American anthology horror television series created by Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk. Each season is conceived as a self-contained miniseries, following a different set of characters and settings, and a storyline with its own “beginning, middle, and end.” Some plot elements of each season are loosely inspired by true events. The only actors to appear in all iterations of the show are Evan Peters and Sarah Paulson. The first season, retroactively subtitled Murder House, takes place in Los Angeles, California, during the year 2011, and centers on a family that moves into a house haunted by its deceased former occupants. The second season, subtitled Asylum, takes place in Massachusetts during the year 1964, and follows the stories of the patients and staff of an institution for the criminally insane. The third season, subtitled Coven, takes place in New Orleans, Louisiana, during the year 2013, and follows a coven of witches who face off against those who wish to destroy them. The fourth season, subtitled Freak Show, takes place in Jupiter, Florida, during the year 1952, and centers around one of the few remaining American freak shows. The fifth season, subtitled Hotel, takes place in Los Angeles, California, during the year 2015, and focuses on the staff and guests of a supernatural hotel. The sixth season, subtitled Roanoke, takes place in North Carolina during the year 2016, and focuses on the paranormal events that take place at an isolated farmhouse. The seventh season, subtitled Cult, takes place in the fictional Brookfield Heights, Michigan and centers around a cult terrorizing a suburb in the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The series is broadcast on the cable television channel FX in the United States. On January 12, 2017, the series was renewed for an eighth and ninth season. In June 2018, it was announced that the eighth season would be a “crossover” between Murder House and Coven, featuring characters and elements from both seasons. Although reception to individual seasons has varied, American Horror Story has, overall, been well received by television critics, with the majority of the praise going towards the cast, particularly Jessica Lange, who won two Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award for her performances. Additionally, Kathy Bates and James Cromwell each won an Emmy Award for their performances, while Lady Gaga won a Golden Globe Award. The series draws consistently high ratings for the FX network, with its first season being the most-viewed new cable series of 2011.

South Beach Tow - Title sequences - Netflix

American Horror Story's title screens offer vague hints to important plot elements and events that compose each season. For Murder House, Murphy described the sequence as a mini-mystery and stated that: “By the time you see the ninth episode of this season, every image in that title sequence will be explained,” establishing the purpose of the title sequence for future seasons. The opening title sequence was created by Kyle Cooper and his company Prologue. He also created the title sequence for the AMC series The Walking Dead and the 1995 film Seven. The theme music was composed by sound designer Cesar Davila-Irizarry and musician Charlie Clouser. The cinematography was done by Juan Ruiz Anchía and the editing by Gabriel J. Diaz. For the first season, the sequence is set in the Harmons' basement and includes images of postmortem young children, fetuses in jars, skulls, a christening dress, a nurse's uniform, and a figure holding a pair of bloody hedge clippers. A photo of alleged axe murderer Lizzie Borden is shown. The second season's opening sequence is done by the same creative team. “We are shooting a new title sequence with the same team that did last year's,” series creator Ryan Murphy said. “The song may stay... not sure.” The music was kept, and the new title sequence was set around the Asylum, using shots of inmates raving and surgeons operating on patients with bandages obscuring their faces. Elements include a young girl walking backwards on her hands and feet up a staircase and a shot of the Virgin Mary's smile changing from one of benevolence to one of spite. The third season's opening sequence keeps the same music, and this sequence is the first one to be filmed primarily outside and not in an enclosed location. Shots include figures wearing black robes and capirotes, a bony-skeleton creature with wings and shots of dead goats, the Minotaur from the season also appears. For the first time, there are actual backgrounds that appear with the actor names instead of an all-black background, some of these images include witches hanging and Santa Muerte. Other elements include a black man with piercing eyes and a disturbing smile as well as voodoo dolls. The final shot continues after the figures in black capirotes seize one of their own who is later seen burning at a stake where young, dress-clad witches dance around. The fourth season's opening sequence changed things up, the series theme music remains intact albeit with an added carnival-like soundscape. The sequence is composed of both CGI and stop-motion animation and features strange characters such as a skeleton chimera of a human being and an elephant riding a bicycle, a skeleton of what appears to be a single head but two bodies, a devil-like man, a boy in a wheel chair with deformed legs, a character with severe syndactyly of the hands and feet, a clown who can twist his head around, a woman with a third leg where her genitalia should be, and a demonic cymbal-banging monkey toy. There are also shots of side show attractions like the Human Blockhead, knife throwing and sword swallowing. The main recurring element features a balloon twister popping balloons with a knife. The fifth season's opening sequence also was very different from previous seasons', taking a more biblical approach. The font, while remaining the same as the first four seasons, glow in red against a hotel wallpaper. The Ten Commandments are also shown throughout the video. The intro returns to live-action like the first three seasons. Visuals include many people scrubbing blood all over the walls and the floor, strange things shown through peepholes, people being victims to the hotel, little kids running around the hotel, as well as many different creatures. The sixth season featured no title sequence or opening credits, instead opting for a simple title card (from the first season) which read “American Horror Story”, while the series theme music plays over the end credits. At the end of the finale's credits, the title of the season “American Horror Story: Roanoke” was revealed. In the development of the seventh season, Murphy confirmed that the opening sequence will return. The seventh season's opening sequence features the series theme music played by a marching band. The sequence is live-action. Visuals include: a gang of clowns rises from a casket, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton masks, a George Washington statue, a dead dog killed by toxic gas, a Merry Go Round, bloody hands that cannot be washed, beehive, toxic smoke released from a grenade, holes in several forms, bloody US flag with sound of a xylophone playing The Star-Spangled Banner, blood covered couple having sex and a handcuffed pinky promise. Clowns also appear throughout the sequence. The title sequence for all seasons of the show use a variation of the Willow typeface that very closely resembles a style for which Scottish designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh was known.

South Beach Tow - References - Netflix