The series closely follows the plot of the novel, which, like many of Pratchett's novels it introduces an element of modern society into the magical and vaguely late medieval, early modern world of the Disc, in this case Rock and Roll music and stardom, with nearly disastrous consequences. It also introduces Susan Sto Helit, daughter of Mort and Ysabell and granddaughter of Death. The series takes the association of the "Band with Rocks In" with the Beatles even further than the book does, evolving their style from 1950s rock and early 1960s beat music (and mixing-bowl haircuts) in Ankh-Morpork, to acid rock in Scrote, to spiritual hippie rock in Quirm. In Sto Lat, they sound like the Jimi Hendrix Experience or Bad Company, but are dressed in clothes similar to the Beatles on the cover of the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

Soul Music - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 25 minutes

Premier: 1997-05-12

Soul Music - Blue-eyed soul - Netflix

Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is rhythm and blues and soul music performed by white artists. The term was coined in the mid-1960s, to describe white artists who performed soul and R&B that was similar to the music of the Motown and Stax record labels. Though many rhythm and blues radio stations in that period would play music only by black musicians, some began to play music by white acts considered to have “soul feeling” and their music was then described as “blue-eyed soul”.

Soul Music - 1970s - Netflix

In February 1975, Tower of Power became the first white/mixed act to appear on Soul Train. Also in 1975, David Bowie, another early white artist to appear on Soul Train, released Young Americans, a popular blue-eyed soul album which Bowie himself called “plastic soul”. It featured the funk-inspired “Fame”, which became Bowie's first number-one hit in the US. Hall & Oates' 1975 Silver Album (real title Daryl Hall & John Oates) includes the ballad “Sara Smile”, long considered a blue-eyed soul standard. “She's Gone”, another soulful hit, was originally released in 1973 but did better as a re-release after “Sara Smile”. Average White Band is a Scottish funk and R&B band who had a series of soul and disco hits between 1974 and 1980, their biggest two being “Pick Up the Pieces” from their 1974 best-selling album AWB, and “Cut the Cake” from their 1975 album of the same name. Boz Scaggs' 1976 “Lowdown”, which featured Scaggs' laid-back vocals and a smooth funky groove, peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart (and reaching Top 5 on the R&B chart). In April 1976, The Faragher Brothers became the first all-white ensemble to make an appearance on Soul Train. In September that year, white funk band Wild Cherry released the Billboard Hot 100 chart topping funk/rock single “Play That Funky Music” and also went to number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart. The single would eventually sell over two million copies. In 1978, The Bee Gees topped R&B album charts with their Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, along with several songs from the album, including “Stayin' Alive”, “Night Fever” and “You Should Be Dancing”, which originally charted back in 1976. The Bee Gees again had a hit album on the R&B charts in 1979 with the Spirits Having Flown album along with its three pop number-one singles, “Too Much Heaven”, “Tragedy” and “Love You Inside Out”. Yvonne Elliman's If I Can't Have You and cover of Hello Stranger both charted on the R & B charts, as well as Linda Ronstadt's cover of Ooh Baby, Baby. Other blue-eyed soul of the decade include the hits “How Long” by Ace (Paul Carrack, lead vocals), three hits by Ambrosia, “How Much I Feel”, “Biggest Part of Me” and “You're the Only Woman”, and Bobby Caldwell's soul standard “What You Won't Do for Love”.

Soul Music - References - Netflix