Sniper Lee Ho Yeung (Michael Tse) left the Special Duties Unit as he failed in an operation, and since then he has gradually developed personal enmity towards his co-worker and good friend Ko Chun Kin (Eddie Cheung).

Ho Yeung becomes a yacht merchant and then becomes a president of a Firearms Association, colluding with organised crime syndicates on the sly. Taking advantage of the trust laid upon him by a detective of the Organised Crime and Triad Bureau, Seung Koon Ming Chu (Kate Tsui), he has quite a grasp on police operations that raid on the crime syndicates. On top of that, with his girlfriend Lai Chan (Eliza Sam) being a member of the Special Duties Unit, Ho Yeung gains first-move advantage in all respects. On the flip side, Chun Kin has been kept in the dark for the whole time, until he finds there is something suspicious regarding the criminal's modus operandi in several murder cases. Later on, owing to a money laundering case, Ho Yeung deliberately approaches Chun Kin's good friend, Wong Yeuk Ling (Kathy Chow), who learns that Chun Kin was the sniper who shot her in the head many years ago. Without anyone noticing, a tense standoff between the brothers is about to unfold.

Sniper Standoff - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Chinese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 2013-09-09

Sniper Standoff - M24 Sniper Weapon System - Netflix

The M24 Sniper Weapon System (SWS) is the military and police version of the Remington Model 700 rifle, M24 being the model name assigned by the United States Army after adoption as their standard sniper rifle in 1988. The M24 is referred to as a “weapon system” because it consists of not only a rifle, but also a detachable telescopic sight and other accessories. The M24 SWS has the “long action” bolt version of the Remington 700 receiver but is chambered for the 7.62×51mm NATO “short action” cartridge that has an overall length of 2.750 inches (69.85 mm). The “long action” allows the rifle to be re-configured for dimensionally larger cartridges up to 3.340 inches (84.84 mm) in overall length. The M24 originally came tapped for the Leupold Ultra M3A 10×42mm fixed-power scope, which came with a circle-shaped mil-dot glass-etched reticle. This was later replaced in 1998 by the cheaper Leupold Mk 4 LR/T M1 10×40mm fixed-power scope with an elongated-shaped mil-dot wire reticle. The first number is the scope's magnification (10) and the second number in millimeters (40mm) is the diameter of the objective lens. A fixed power scope has only one magnification (e.g., 10×) and a variable power scope can be adjusted to focus between a range of magnifications (e.g., 3–9× is adjustable from a minimum power of 3× to a maximum power of 9×). The rifle itself comes with a detachable Harris 9–13" 1A2-LM or Harris 9–13" 1A2-L bipod unit. The M24 SWS was to be replaced with the M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System, a contract awarded to Knight's Armament Company. However, the Army still continued to acquire M24s from Remington until February 2010 and upgraded to the A2 and M24E1 standard in many cases, continuing to serve. The Army chose to upgrade its entire M24 rifle fleet to the M2010 Enhanced Sniper Rifle, with the final M24 being converted in April 2014.

Sniper Standoff - M24A3 - Netflix

Remington developed the M24A3 SWS, a variant of the M24 chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum round (8.58×70mm) and feeding from a 5-round detachable box magazine. It comes tapped for the Leupold Mk 4 M1LR/T 8.5–25×50mm Variable Power day scope. It can also use detachable front and rear Back-Up Iron Sights in an emergency (BUIS units are standard accessories that can be fitted to the Picatinny Rail that runs on the top of the receiver and along the barrel).

Sniper Standoff - References - Netflix