Signing Time! is a television program targeted towards children aged one through eight that teaches American Sign Language. It is filmed in the United States and was created by sisters Emilie Brown and Rachel Coleman, the latter of whom hosts the series. Between the years 2006 and 2008, it was aired by American Public Television in many cities across the US. Signing Time! is produced and distributed by Two Little Hands Productions, which is located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Signing Time's multi-sensory approach encourages learning through three senses — visual, auditory and kinesthetic — and reaches children with diverse learning styles and abilities by encouraging interaction through signing, singing, speaking and dancing. Throughout the series, Coleman, her daughter Leah, Leah's cousin Alex, and Hopkins, an animated frog, teach ASL vocabulary-building signs. The series teaches signs for common words, questions, phrases, movements, colors, sports, days of the week, everyday objects, and common activities.

Signing Time! - Netflix

Type: Variety

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2002-05-01

Signing Time! - Code signing - Netflix

Code signing is the process of digitally signing executables and scripts to confirm the software author and guarantee that the code has not been altered or corrupted since it was signed. The process employs the use of a cryptographic hash to validate authenticity and integrity. Code signing can provide several valuable features. The most common use of code signing is to provide security when deploying; in some programming languages, it can also be used to help prevent namespace conflicts. Almost every code signing implementation will provide some sort of digital signature mechanism to verify the identity of the author or build system, and a checksum to verify that the object has not been modified. It can also be used to provide versioning information about an object or to store other meta data about an object. The efficacy of code signing as an authentication mechanism for software depends on the security of underpinning signing keys. As with other public key infrastructure (PKI) technologies, the integrity of the system relies on publishers securing their private keys against unauthorized access. Keys stored in software on general-purpose computers are susceptible to compromise. Therefore, it is more secure, and best practice, to store keys in secure, tamper-proof, cryptographic hardware devices known as hardware security modules or HSMs.

Signing Time! - Implementations - Netflix

IBM's Lotus Notes has had PKI signing of code from Release 1, and both client and server software have execution control lists to control what levels of access to data, environment and file system are permitted for given users. Individual design elements, including active items such as scripts, actions and agents, are always signed using the editor's ID file, which includes both the editor's and the domain's public keys. Core templates such as the mail template are signed with a dedicated ID held by the Lotus template development team. Microsoft implements a form of code signing (based on Authenticode) provided for Microsoft tested drivers. Since drivers run in the kernel, they can destabilize the system or open the system to security holes. For this reason, Microsoft tests drivers submitted to its WHQL program. After the driver has passed, Microsoft signs that version of the driver as being safe. On 32-bit systems only, installing drivers that are not validated with Microsoft is possible after accepting to allow the installation in a prompt warning the user that the code is unsigned. For .NET (managed) code, there is an additional mechanism called Strong Name Signing that uses Public/Private keys and SHA-1 hash as opposed to certificates. However, Microsoft discourages reliance on Strong Name Signing as a replacement for Authenticode.

Signing Time! - References - Netflix