Eleven young hearts with eleven dreams. Deep in their hearts, each girl has a secret dream of love and sadness. They meet together at Acropolis Tower to see if their dreams will come true. Imagine what happens when eleven average girls with eleven special talents join together to make the world a better place.

Seraphim Call - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 25 minutes

Premier: 1999-10-06

Seraphim Call - Seraphim Falls - Netflix

Seraphim Falls is a 2006 American Revisionist Western film directed by television producer and director David Von Ancken in his first feature film. The storyline was conceived from a screenplay written by Von Ancken and Abby Everett Jaques. The fictional story focuses on a bounty hunt for a Union soldier by a Confederate colonel following the American Civil War in the late 1860s. Pierce Brosnan, Liam Neeson, Michael Wincott, Tom Noonan, and Ed Lauter star in principal roles. Seraphim Falls explores civil topics, such as violence, human survival and war. The film was produced by the motion picture studio of Icon Productions. It was commercially distributed by Samuel Goldwyn Films and Destination Films theatrically, and by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment for home media. The film score was composed by musician Harry Gregson-Williams, although a soundtrack version for the motion picture was not released to the public. Seraphim Falls premiered at the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival and was released to theaters in limited release in the United States on January 26, 2007 grossing $418,296 in domestic ticket sales. It earned an additional $801,762 in box office business overseas for a combined worldwide total of $1,220,058 in revenue. The film was generally met with positive critical reviews before its initial screening in cinemas. The widescreen DVD edition of the film featuring scene selections and a bonus featurette, was released in the United States on May 15, 2007.

Seraphim Call - Critical response - Netflix

Among mainstream critics in the U.S., the film received mixed to positive reviews. Rotten Tomatoes reported that 54% of 81 sampled critics gave the film a positive review, with an average score of 5.7 out of 10. At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average out of 100 to critics' reviews, the film received a score of 62 based on 21 reviews. Following its cinematic release in 2007, Seraphim Falls received a nomination from the Gotham Awards for the “Breakthrough Director Award”. In 2008, the film won the “Best Specialty Stunt” award from the Taurus World Stunt Awards for Mark Vanselow and Craig Hosking. In a mixed review, Christy Lemire writing in the Deseret News mused about the lead characters, stating, “Their climactic confrontation is visually arresting in its starkness. But as an anti-war statement, a call to lay down arms that's clearly intended to be relevant today, it's a bit too clunky in its literalism.” She ultimately found the film to be “technically solid” but a “dramatically unremarkable Western”. Todd McCarthy of the Variety staff believed the film was “nothing rousing or new” and that Brosnan along with Neeson wouldn't be enough “to muster more than modest theatrical B.O. for this very physical but familiar oater.” He did however reserve praise for the cinematography noting, “Its physical beauty notwithstanding – Toll's work, which emphasizes the blues and greens of the forests, is always a pleasure to behold”. The film however, was not without its supporters. Claudia Puig writing for USA Today offered an almost entirely positive review recalling how she thought the film was a “psychological drama with an intriguing ambiguity that challenges the viewer's loyalties and preconceived notions.” She remarked that the storyline was an “elaborate and relentless chase that takes those involved into primal psychological terrain.” Stephen Holden writing in The New York Times applauded some of the realism displayed in the film, commenting, “Nothing in the rest of the film comes close to matching the impact of Gideon’s carving the bullet from his arm with his hunting knife, then cauterizing the wound while emitting agonizing howls. This scene is enough to give you vicarious hypothermia.” He also expressed his satisfaction with the visual attributes of the picture by saying “Its strongest element is the austere majesty of the cinematography by John Toll (”Braveheart," “Legends of the Fall,” “The Thin Red Line”), in which the severe beauty of the Western landscape looms over the characters as a silent rebuke." Critic Josh Rosenblatt, writing for The Austin Chronicle viewed Seraphim Falls as “Meditative, beautifully shot, and blessed with a healthy dose of cynicism” and a “morality play without the morality and a Western Purgatorio that, in the end, demands its protagonists resign themselves to their loneliness and brutality and avail themselves of the redemptive power of sheer exhaustion.” Kevin Crust of the Los Angeles Times gave the film a somewhat mixed rating calling it “A beautifully shot chase film by writer-director David Von Ancken and co-writer Abby Everett Jaques, it moves along with minimalist efficiency” but overall admitting it ran out of “gas during an overlong allegorical final section.” Author Joshua Rothkopf of Time Out commented that the film “has all the good looks of its wintry Oregon locales, not to mention the equally craggy faces of Liam Neeson and a grizzled-up Pierce Brosnan, embroiled in a Fugitive-like pursuit with the latter on the run.” Peter Rainer of The Christian Science Monitor highlighted the film's merits by declaring that it was “essentially one long, bleak stalk-and-kill action thriller. From the rugged snowscapes to the cracked desert vistas, director David Von Ancken and cinematographer John Toll serve up a whole lot of eye candy from the great outdoors.” He added, “The film functions as a kind of survivalists' guide, and there's a morbid pleasure in seeing how Gideon extricates himself from one impossible situation after another.” Alternately though, columnist Joe Morgenstern of The Wall Street Journal sadly mentioned, “things take a turn from simplicity to sententiousness, then to surreal silliness, and finally to a mano-à-mano contest, on a parched desert floor, over which man gets the best close-ups.”

Seraphim Call - References - Netflix