This six-part series follows the efforts of dedicated enthusiasts committed to restoring retired fighter planes to their former glory.

Plane Resurrection - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-01-30

Plane Resurrection - A Tale of Two Cities - Netflix

A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel tells the story of the French Doctor Manette, his 18-year-long imprisonment in the Bastille in Paris and his release to life in London with his daughter Lucie, whom he had never met; Lucie's marriage and the collision between her beloved husband and the people who caused her father's imprisonment; and Monsieur and Madame Defarge, sellers of wine in a poor suburb of Paris. The story is set against the conditions that led up to the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror.

Plane Resurrection - Resurrection - Netflix

So wicked do destruction and secrecy appear to honest minds, that Mr. Lorry and Miss Pross, while engaged in the commission of their deed and in the removal of its traces, almost felt, and almost looked, like accomplices in a horrible crime.

In Dickens' England, resurrection always sat firmly in a Christian context. Most broadly, Sydney Carton is resurrected in spirit at the novel's close (even as he, paradoxically, gives up his physical life to save Darnay's.) More concretely, “Book the First” deals with the rebirth of Dr. Manette from the living death of his incarceration. Resurrection appears for the first time when Mr. Lorry replies to the message carried by Jerry Cruncher with the words “Recalled to Life”. Resurrection also appears during Mr. Lorry's coach ride to Dover, as he constantly ponders a hypothetical conversation with Dr. Manette: (“Buried how long?” “Almost eighteen years.” ... “You know that you are recalled to life?” “They tell me so.”) He believes he is helping with Dr. Manette's revival and imagines himself “digging” up Dr. Manette from his grave. Resurrection is a major theme in the novel. In Jarvis Lorry's thoughts of Dr. Manette, resurrection is first spotted as a theme. It is also the last theme: Carton's sacrifice. Dickens originally wanted to call the entire novel Recalled to Life. (This instead became the title of the first of the novel's three “books”.) Jerry is also part of the recurring theme: he himself is involved in death and resurrection in ways the reader does not yet know. The first piece of foreshadowing comes in his remark to himself: “You'd be in a blazing bad way, if recalling to life was to come into fashion, Jerry!” The black humour of this statement becomes obvious only much later on. Five years later, one cloudy and very dark night (in June 1780), Mr. Lorry reawakens the reader's interest in the mystery by telling Jerry it is “Almost a night ... to bring the dead out of their graves”. Jerry responds firmly that he has never seen the night do that. It turns out that Jerry Cruncher's involvement with the theme of resurrection is that he is what the Victorians called a “Resurrection Man”, one who (illegally) digs up dead bodies to sell to medical men (there was no legal way to procure cadavers for study at that time). The opposite of resurrection is of course death. Death and resurrection appear often in the novel. Dickens is angered that in France and England, courts hand out death sentences for insignificant crimes. In France, peasants had formerly been put to death without any trial, at the whim of a noble. The Marquis tells Darnay with pleasure that “[I]n the next room (my bedroom), one fellow ... was poniarded on the spot for professing some insolent delicacy respecting his daughter—his daughter!” Interestingly, the demolition of Dr. Manette's shoe-making workbench by Miss Pross and Mr. Lorry is described as “the burning of the body”. It seems clear that this is a rare case where death or destruction (the opposite of resurrection) has a positive connotation since the “burning” helps liberate the doctor from the memory of his long imprisonment. But Dickens's description of this kind and healing act is strikingly odd:

Sydney Carton's martyrdom atones for all his past wrongdoings. He even finds God during the last few days of his life, repeating Christ's soothing words, “I am the resurrection and the life”. Resurrection is the dominant theme of the last part of the novel. Darnay is rescued at the last moment and recalled to life; Carton chooses death and resurrection to a life better than that which he has ever known: “it was the peacefullest man's face ever beheld there ... he looked sublime and prophetic”. In the broadest sense, at the end of the novel, Dickens foresees a resurrected social order in France, rising from the ashes of the old one.

Plane Resurrection - References - Netflix