National Enquirer Investigates will make viewers question everything they thought they knew about the most sensational crimes and celebrity scandals in Hollywood history. Could new evidence prove once and for all that Natalie Wood was murdered? Is there a never-before-uncovered eyewitness who saw O.J. Simpson at Nicole Brown's house that fateful night? Were Whitney Houston and Bobbi Kristina Brown actually murdered? Developed in partnership with American Media, Inc. and America's most popular weekly magazine, The National Enquirer, the series gives viewers unprecedented access to The National Enquirer's secret files, featuring never-before-told stories alongside fascinating new evidence, insider interviews and fresh expert analysis.

National Enquirer Investigates - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2016-05-28

National Enquirer Investigates - Travis Walton UFO incident - Netflix

The Travis Walton UFO incident was an alleged abduction of an American logger by a UFO on November 5, 1975, while working with a logging crew in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest near Snowflake, Arizona. Walton reappeared after a five-day search. The Walton case received mainstream publicity and remains one of the best-known alien abduction stories. Skeptics consider it a hoax. Walton wrote a book about his purported abduction in 1978 called The Walton Experience, which was adapted into the film Fire in the Sky in 1993, written by Tracy Tormé.

National Enquirer Investigates - Skeptical reception - Netflix

Skeptics consider the case to be a hoax, describing it as “sensationalizing on the part of the media” and “a put-up job to make money.” UFO researcher Philip J. Klass considered Walton's story to be a hoax perpetrated for financial gain, and discovered many “discrepancies” in the accounts of Walton and his co-workers. After investigating the case, Klass reported that the polygraph tests were “poorly administered”, that Walton used “polygraph countermeasures” such as holding his breath, and uncovered an earlier failed test administered by an examiner who concluded the case involved “gross deception”. Science and skepticism writer Michael Shermer criticized Walton's claims, saying, “I think the polygraph is not a reliable determiner of truth. I think Travis Walton was not abducted by aliens. In both cases, the power of deception and self-deception is all we need to understand what really happened in 1975 and after.” Cognitive psychologist Susan Clancy argues that alien abduction reports began only after stories of extraterrestrials appeared in films and on TV, and that Walton was likely influenced by the NBC television movie The UFO Incident that aired two weeks before his own claimed abduction and dramatized the alien abduction claims of Betty and Barney Hill. Clancy noted the rise in alien abduction claims following the movie and cites Klass's conclusions that “after viewing this movie, any person with a little imagination could now become an instant celebrity”, concluding that “one of those instant celebrities was Travis Walton.”

National Enquirer Investigates - References - Netflix