Have you ever wondered what happens to your home once you move out? Will the new owners keep your beloved hand-painted mural on the nursery wall? What is the fate of the all-pink bathroom you so adored? How about the vintage 1950s kitchen you cherished for all of those years? When new homeowners move into your old home, they could love it all or rip it all out without much thought! What would you do if you could actually see what they did to undo the blood, sweat and tears invested in your home? Now Moving Up gives you the chance! Moving Up, a series hosted by noted and charismatic TLC personality Doug Wilson, returns for a second season. We follow a chain of new homeowners who move into one another's homes and begin the design and renovation process. They all have plenty to say about their new digs and the unappealing design demons the past owners left behind! They'll work tirelessly to make their new house their home with numerous design choices and big renovations to implement. After the renovations are complete, the old homeowners will get the rare chance to visit their once beloved homes and see all of the new changes. Will they happily approve of what they see or will they wish that they had never come back? Taste is tested in Moving Up, and host Doug Wilson is there to invoke fond memories, humorous observations and cantankerous commentary every step of the way!

Moving Up - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2005-10-08

Moving Up - NHL Entry Draft - Netflix

The NHL Entry Draft (French: Repêchage d'entrée dans la LNH) is an annual meeting in which every franchise of the National Hockey League (NHL) systematically select the rights to available ice hockey players who meet draft eligibility requirements (North American players 18–20 years old and European/international players 18–21 years old; all others enter league as unrestricted free agents). The NHL Entry Draft is held once every year, generally within two to three months after the conclusion of the previous season. During the draft, teams take turns selecting amateur players from junior or collegiate leagues and professional players from European leagues. The first draft was held in 1963, and has been held every year since. The NHL Entry Draft was known as the NHL Amateur Draft until 1979. The entry draft has only been a public event since 1980, and a televised event since 1984. Up to 1994, the order was solely determined by the standings at the end of the regular season. In 1995, the NHL Draft Lottery was introduced where only teams who had missed the playoffs could participate. The one lottery winner would move up the draft order a maximum of four places, meaning only the top five-placed teams could pick first in the draft, and no team in the non-playoff group could move down more than one place. The chances of winning the lottery were weighted towards the teams at the bottom of the regular season standings. Beginning in 2013, the limit of moving up a maximum of four places in the draft order was eliminated, so the lottery winner would automatically receive the first overall pick, and any teams above it in the draft order would still move down one spot.

Moving Up - Selection order and draft lottery - Netflix

The selection order in the NHL Entry Draft is determined by a combination of lottery, regular season standing, and playoff results. While teams are permitted to trade draft picks both during the draft and prior to it (sometimes several years prior), in all cases, the selection order of the draft picks is based on the original holder of the pick, not a team which may have acquired the pick via a trade or other means. The order of picks discussed in this section always references the original team. The basic order of the NHL Entry Draft is determined based on the standings of the teams in the previous season. As with the other major sports leagues, the basic draft order is intended to favour the teams with the weakest performance who presumably need the most improvement in their roster to compete with the other teams. Subject to the results of the NHL Draft Lottery (discussed below), the teams pick in the same order each round, with each team getting one pick per round. The basic order of the picks is determined as follows: The teams that did not qualify for the playoffs the previous season (picks 1–15) The teams that made the playoffs in the previous season but did not win either their division in the regular season or play in the Conference Finals (picks 16–23 up to 27) The teams that won their divisions in the previous season but did not play in the Conference Finals (potentially picks 24–27) The teams that lose in Conference Finals (picks 28 and 29) The team that was the runner-up in the Stanley Cup Finals (pick 30) The team that won the Stanley Cup in the previous season (pick 31) The number of teams in the second and third group depends on whether the Conference finalists also won their division. The teams in each group (other than the Stanley Cup winner and runner up) are ordered within that group based on their point totals in the preceding regular season (with the lowest point total picking first). Tie-breakers are governed by the same rules used to determine ties in the regular season standings. The order of picks 1–15 may change during the first round of the draft based on the results of the NHL Draft lottery. In the subsequent rounds, the basic order based on point totals is used. When teams lose their rights to a first-round draft choice, because that player was not signed to a contract and consequently re-entered the entry draft or became an unrestricted free agent, they are awarded a compensatory draft pick. This selection will be the same numerical choice as the first round draft pick who was not signed, but in the second round. For example, if a team cannot sign the seventh overall first round draft choice, it will receive the seventh pick in the second round of the next draft as compensation.

Moving Up - References - Netflix