Fish biologist Zeb Hogan heads off on another adventure searching for the world's largest fresh water fish. This season will follow him as he looks for everything from mythical giant catfish to the king of the Alaskan rivers, the Chinook salmon. Zeb will travel across the United States, and then he'll head off to Asia. He'll work with researchers, fisherman, enthusiasts and eccentrics to find some of the strangest fish we've seen yet. Following legends, first eyes accounts and word of mouth, Zeb's journey won't stop until he discovers the world's true "Monster Fish".

Monster Fish - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2009-07-27

Monster Fish - Monster - Netflix

A monster is a creature which produces fear or physical harm by its appearance or its actions. Derived from the Latin monstrum, the word usually connotes something wrong or evil; a monster is generally morally objectionable, physically or psychologically hideous, or a freak of nature. They are usually composites of different creatures, or hybrids of humans and animals, but the term can also be applied figuratively to describe someone with similar characteristics, such as a person who does cruel or horrific things. Monsters pre-date written history, but do not emerge from a cultural void. Instead, they have their origins in a society's literary and cultural heritage, the academic study of which is known as monstrophy. Monsters have appeared in literature and in feature-length films. Well-known monsters in fiction include Count Dracula, Frankenstein's monster, werewolves, mummies, and zombies.

Monster Fish - Post–World War II monster films - Netflix

In the post–World War II era, however, giant monsters returned to the screen with a vigor that has been causally linked to the development of nuclear weapons. One early example occurred in the American film The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, which was about a dinosaur that attacked a lighthouse. Subsequently, there were Japanese film depictions, (Godzilla, Gamera), British depictions (Gorgo), and even Danish depictions (Reptilicus), of giant monsters attacking cities. A recent depiction of a giant monster is depicted in J. J. Abrams's Cloverfield, which was released in theaters January 18, 2008. The intriguing proximity of other planets brought the notion of extraterrestrial monsters to the big screen, some of which were huge in size (such as King Ghidorah and Gigan), while others were of a more human scale. During this period, the fish-man monster Gill-man was developed in the film series Creature from the Black Lagoon.

Britain's Hammer Film Productions brought color to the monster movies in the late 1950s. Around this time, the earlier Universal films were usually shown on American television by independent stations (rather than network stations) by using announcers with strange personas, who gained legions of young fans. Although they have since changed considerably, movie monsters did not entirely disappear from the big screen as they did in the late 1940s. Occasionally, monsters are depicted as friendly or misunderstood creatures. King Kong and Frankenstein's monster are two examples of misunderstood creatures. Frankenstein's monster is frequently depicted in this manner, in films such as Monster Squad and Van Helsing. The Hulk is an example of the “Monster as Hero” archetype. The theme of the “Friendly Monster” is pervasive in pop-culture. Chewbacca, Elmo, and Shrek are notable examples of friendly “monsters”. The creatures of Monsters, Inc. scare children in order to create energy for running machinery, while the furry monsters of The Muppets and Sesame Street live in harmony with animals and humans alike. Japanese culture also commonly features monsters which are benevolent or likable, with the most famous examples being the Pokémon franchise and the pioneering anime My Neighbor Totoro. The book series/webisodes/toy line of Monster High is another example.

Monster Fish - References - Netflix