Type: Scripted

Languages: Spanish

Status: Ended

Runtime: 44 minutes

Premier: 1996-01-22

Marisol - Marisol Escobar - Netflix

Marisol Escobar (May 22, 1930 – April 30, 2016), otherwise known simply as Marisol, was a French sculptor of Venezuelan heritage who worked in New York City.

Marisol - Recognition - Netflix

In Pop art, the role of a 'woman' was consistently referred to as either mother or seductress and rarely presented in terms of a female perspective. This portrayal, set within Pop art, was predominately determined by male artists, who commonly portrayed women as commoditized sex objects. As Judy Chicago explained to Holly Williams in her interview for “The Independent” in 2015, there was very little recognition for female artists and artists of color. Artists like Marisol never received the attention they deserved. She was one of many artists disregarded due to the existing modernist canon, which positioned her outside of the core of pop as the feminine opposite to her established male counterparts. Working within a patriarchal field, women often obscured their gender identity in fear of their work being reduced to a 'female sensibility'. Marisol was one of the few who embraced her gender identity. Critical evaluation of Marisol's practice concluded that her feminine view was a reason to separate her from other Pop artists, as she offered sentimental satire rather than a deadpan attitude. Like many artists at that time feared, the female sensibility was the reason Marisol was often marginalized. Art critics, such as Lucy Lippard, began to recognize Marisol in terms of Pop art in 1965. At this time, her sculpture was recognized relative to certain pop objectives. Yet, Lippard primarily spoke of the ways in which Marisol's work differentiated from the intentions of Pop figureheads such as Andy Warhol, Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, and Donald Judd. Lippard defined a Pop artist as an impartial spectator of mass culture depicting modernity through parody, humor, and/or social commentary. Through an objective attitude, she claimed an artist could maintain a position of 'masculine' detachment from the subjects being depicted. As a female artist of color, critics distinguished Marisol from Pop as a 'wise primitive' due to the folk and childlike qualities within her sculptures. Unlike Pop artists of the period, Marisol's sculpture acted as a satiric criticism of contemporary life in which her presence was included in the representations of upper middle-class femininity. Simultaneously, by including her personal presence through photographs and molds, the artist illustrated a self-critique in connection to the human circumstances relevant to all living the “American dream”. Marisol depicted the human vulnerability that was common to all subjects within a feminist critique and differentiated from the controlling male viewpoint of her Pop art associates. Instead of omitting her subjectivity as a woman of color, Marisol redefined female identity by making representations that made mockery of current stereotypes. Critical evaluation of Marisol's practice concluded that her feminine view was a reason to separate her from other Pop artists, as she offered sentimental satire rather than a deadpan attitude. Like many artists feared, this female sensibility was the cause for her to be marginalized by critics as outside of the conceptual framework of Pop Art. Marisol's wit was disregarded as feminine playfulness, therefore, lacking the objectivity and expressionless attitude of male pop artists. Their masculine superiority was celebrated in its opposition to the possibility of an articulate 'feminine' perspective. As Whiting further clarified in her article Figuring Marisol's Femininities, “without feminine Pop, there could not have been a masculine Pop in opposition; without the soft periphery, there could have been no hard core”.

Marisol - References - Netflix