Little Ballers Indiana centers on six 11- and 12-year-old girls who meet as teammates and quickly form a sisterhood over the course of an AAU season. Coached by Diggins' stepdad, Moe Scott, these young phenoms have a deep passion for the game which holds special meaning and high stakes for each player such as: getting an education; team building; conquering physical challenges; improving self-esteem; and proving that girls are just as good at basketball as boys.

Little Ballers Indiana - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2017-03-03

Little Ballers Indiana - Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull - Netflix

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is a 2008 American action-adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and the fourth installment in the Indiana Jones series. Released nineteen years after the previous film, the film is set in 1957, pitting Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) against Soviet agents—led by Irina Spalko (Cate Blanchett)—searching for a telepathic crystal skull. Jones is aided by his former lover, Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen), and her son, Mutt Williams (Shia LaBeouf). Ray Winstone, John Hurt, and Jim Broadbent are also part of the supporting cast. Screenwriters Jeb Stuart, Jeffrey Boam, Frank Darabont, and Jeff Nathanson wrote drafts before David Koepp's script satisfied the producers. The filmmakers intended to pay tribute to the science fiction B-movies of the 1950s era. Shooting began on June 18, 2007, at various locations in New Mexico, New Haven, Connecticut, Hawaii, and Fresno, California, as well as on sound stages in Los Angeles. To maintain aesthetic continuity with the previous films, the crew relied on traditional stunt work instead of computer-generated stunt doubles, and cinematographer Janusz Kamiński studied Douglas Slocombe's style from the previous films. The film premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival on May 18, 2008, and was released worldwide on May 22, 2008 to generally positive reviews from critics, although audience reception was more mixed. There was significant praise for the performances, action scenes, John Williams' musical score, and the costume design. Criticism, however, focused on the dialogue, storyline, pacing, and overuse of CGI. It was also a financial success like the previous three films in the series, grossing over $786 million worldwide, becoming the franchise's highest-grossing film when not adjusted for inflation, as well as the second highest-grossing film of 2008. The film is scheduled to be followed by an untitled fifth film, planned for release on July 10, 2020, with both Spielberg and Ford returning.

Little Ballers Indiana - Fan reception and legacy - Netflix

According to Associated Press, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull received a “respectful” but “far from glowing” reception from Indiana Jones fans, and that “some viewers at its first press screening loved it, some called it slick and enjoyable though formulaic, some said it was not worth the 19-year wait.” South Park parodied the film in the episode “The China Probrem”, broadcast five months after the film's release. The episode parodied the negative fan reaction, with the characters filing a police report against Lucas and Spielberg for “raping Indiana Jones”. Some disappointed Indiana Jones fans used the term “nuking the fridge”, a reference to the scene in which Jones survives a nuclear blast by hiding in a refrigerator, to denote the point when a franchise crosses into the absurd, similar to “jumping the shark”. This phrase has appeared across the internet, and was chosen as

5 on Time magazine's list of “top ten buzzwords” of 2008. Asked about

the scene and phrase, Spielberg said: “Blame me. Don't blame George. That was my silly idea … I'm proud of that. I'm glad I was able to bring that into popular culture.” Lucas denied this, saying Spielberg was “protecting him”. According to Lucas, he had assembled a dossier of research data to convince Spielberg; Lucas stated that his research claimed the odds of surviving in the refrigerator are about “50-50.” The mixed fanbase reaction did not surprise Lucas, who was familiar with mixed response to the Star Wars prequels, and predicted that “we're all going to get people throwing tomatoes at us.” David Koepp said: “I knew I was going to get hammered from a number of quarters [but] what I liked about the way the movie ended up playing was it was popular with families. I like that families really embraced it.” Although Spielberg said “I'm very happy with the movie. I always have been”, he also said “I sympathize with people who didn't like the MacGuffin [the interdimensional beings] because I never liked the MacGuffin.” At the 2010 Cannes Film Festival, LaBeouf told Los Angeles Times he had “dropped the ball on the legacy that people loved and cherished” and felt that “the movie could have been updated … we just misinterpreted what we were trying to satiate.” In 2011, in response to LaBeouf's comments, Harrison Ford said: “I think I told [LaBeouf] he was a f***ing idiot … As an actor, I think it's my obligation to support the film without making a complete ass of myself. Shia is ambitious, attentive and talented—and he's learning how to deal with a situation which is very unique and difficult.” LaBeouf said he regretted his comments and their effect on his relationship with Spielberg: “He told me there's a time to be a human being and have an opinion, and there's a time to sell cars. It brought me freedom, but it also killed my spirits because this was a dude I looked up to like a sensei.”

Little Ballers Indiana - References - Netflix