Enter the World of Limmy. Scottish internet sensation Limmy makes the jump to TV in a brand new comedy half-hour that combines character pieces, arresting inserts, diverting visuals, casual violence, cutting observations, animation and sketches.

Limmy's Show - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2010-01-11

Limmy's Show - Glasgow patter - Netflix

The Glasgow patter, or Glaswegian, is a Scots dialect spoken in and around Glasgow, Scotland. In addition to local West Mid Scots, the dialect has Highland English and Hiberno-English influences, owing to the speech of Highlanders and Irish people, who migrated in large numbers to the Glasgow area in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Patter is used widely in everyday speech in Glasgow, and even occasionally in broadcasting and print. It is constantly evolving and being updated with new euphemisms as well as nicknames for well-known local figures and buildings.

Limmy's Show - In the media - Netflix

In the 1970s, the Glasgow-born comedian Stanley Baxter parodied the patter on his television sketch show. “Parliamo Glasgow” was a spoof programme in which Baxter played a language coach and various scenarios using Glaswegian dialogue were played out for laughs. Michael Munro wrote a guide to Glasgow Patter entitled The Patter, first published in 1985. With illustrations by David Neilson, and later by the Paisley-born artist and playwright John Byrne, the book became very popular in Glasgow. It was followed by The Patter - Another Blast in 1988, with The Complete Patter, an updated compendium of the first and second books, being published in 1996. James Kelman's 1994 novel How Late It Was, How Late is written largely in Glaswegian dialect from the point of view of Sammy Samuels, a 38-year-old ex-convict who wakes up blind after a drinking binge and a fight with police. The novel won the 1994 Booker Prize. The 1998 film My Name is Joe is one of the few films recorded [almost] entirely in Glasgow dialect. As a result, the film had to be given subtitles when released in the USA. Jamie Stuart, a Church of Scotland elder from the High Carntyne Church, produced “A Glasgow Bible” in 1997, relating some biblical tales in the Glaswegian vernacular. More recently, in 2014 Alice's Adventures in Wonderland was translated into Glaswegian Scots by Thomas Clark as Alice's Adventirs in Wunnerlaun. Popular Scottish television comedies such as Rab C. Nesbitt, Chewin' the Fat, Still Game and Limmy's Show also provide reference material, and have themselves contributed popular new expressions to The Patter.

Limmy's Show - References - Netflix