Land of the Eagle is the first television series to attempt a comprehensive account of North America's wildlife and wild places. Land of the Eagle turns the clock back to reveal the continent as it used to be, hundreds of years ago, a story told by the people who lived on it, charted it and shaped it - the Native Americans and the European explorers and settlers. This eight-part series explores the great diversity of the continent, revealing the bonds between human history and natural history as it travels from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Along the way, it traverses the rugged Canadian wilderness, the swampy Everglades, the sweeping Great Plains, the majestic Rockies, the arid, hostile deserts, and Alaska - the last wild frontier of America. Together, the eight programmes reveal the way that the nature of this 'untamed' land shaped the lives and fortunes of those who ventured into its vast interior. Through their writings and diaries, Peter Crawford's award-winning series recreates the landscapes and wildlife of North America at the time when the first Europeans came to this 'new world'.

Land of the Eagle - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1990-02-25

Land of the Eagle - Bald eagle - Netflix

The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, from Greek ἅλς, hals “sea”, αἰετός aietos “eagle”, λευκός, leukos “white”, κεφαλή, kephalē “head”) is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known subspecies and forms a species pair with the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). Its range includes most of Canada and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico. It is found near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting. The bald eagle is an opportunistic feeder which subsists mainly on fish, which it swoops down and snatches from the water with its talons. It builds the largest nest of any North American bird and the largest tree nests ever recorded for any animal species, up to 4 m (13 ft) deep, 2.5 m (8.2 ft) wide, and 1 metric ton (1.1 short tons) in weight. Sexual maturity is attained at the age of four to five years. Bald eagles are not actually bald; the name derives from an older meaning of the word, “white headed”. The adult is mainly brown with a white head and tail. The sexes are identical in plumage, but females are about 25 percent larger than males. The beak is large and hooked. The plumage of the immature is brown. The bald eagle is both the national bird and national animal of the United States of America. The bald eagle appears on its seal. In the late 20th century it was on the brink of extirpation in the contiguous United States. Populations have since recovered and the species was removed from the U.S. government's list of endangered species on July 12, 1995 and transferred to the list of threatened species. It was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the Lower 48 States on June 28, 2007.

Land of the Eagle - National bird of the United States - Netflix

For my own part. I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen the representative of our country. He is a bird of bad moral character. He does not get his living honestly ... besides he is a rank coward: The little king bird not bigger than a sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the district.

The bald eagle is the national bird of the United States of America. The founders of the United States were fond of comparing their new republic with the Roman Republic, in which eagle imagery (usually involving the golden eagle) was prominent. On June 20, 1782, the Continental Congress adopted the design for the Great Seal of the United States depicting a bald eagle grasping 13 arrows and an olive branch with its talons. The bald eagle appears on most official seals of the U.S. government, including the presidential seal, the presidential flag, and in the logos of many U.S. federal agencies. Between 1916 and 1945, the presidential flag (but not the seal) showed an eagle facing to its left (the viewer's right), which gave rise to the urban legend that the flag is changed to have the eagle face towards the olive branch in peace, and towards the arrows in wartime. Contrary to popular legend, there is no evidence that Benjamin Franklin ever publicly supported the wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), rather than the bald eagle, as a symbol of the United States. However, in a letter written to his daughter in 1784 from Paris, criticizing the Society of the Cincinnati, he stated his personal distaste for the bald eagle's behavior. In the letter Franklin states:

Franklin opposed the creation of the Society because he viewed it, with its hereditary membership, as a noble order unwelcome in the newly independent Republic, contrary to the ideals of Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus, for whom the Society was named; his reference to the two kinds of birds is interpreted as a satirical comparison between the Society of the Cincinnati and Cincinnatus.

Land of the Eagle - References - Netflix