Keith Burrows is a mild-mannered TV weatherman for KPOX-TV, and Shabu is a hip, fun-loving 3,000-year-old genie who is freed by Burrows after being imprisoned in his bottle for nearly two centuries.

Just Our Luck - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1983-09-20

Just Our Luck - Luck - Netflix

Luck is the experience of notably positive, negative, or improbable events. The naturalistic interpretation is that positive and negative events happen all the time in human lives, both due to random and non-random natural and artificial processes, and that even improbable events can happen by random chance. In this view, being “lucky” or “unlucky” is simply a descriptive label that points out an event's positivity, negativity, or improbability. Supernatural interpretations of luck consider it to be an attribute of a person or object, or the result of a favorable or unfavorable view of a deity upon a person. These interpretations often prescribe how luckiness or unluckiness can be obtained, such as by carrying a lucky charm or making sacrifices or prayers to a deity. Saying someone is “born lucky” then might mean, depending on the interpretation, anything from that they have been born into a good family or circumstance, or that they habitually experience improbably positive events due to some inherent property or the lifelong favor of a god or goddess in a monotheistic or polytheistic religion, Many superstitions are related to luck, though these are often specific to a given culture or set of related cultures, and sometimes contradictory. For example, lucky symbols include the number 7 in Christian-influenced cultures, but the number 8 in Chinese-influenced cultures. Unlucky symbols and events include entering and leaving a house by different doors in Greek culture, throwing rocks into the wind in Navajo culture, and ravens in Western culture. Some of these associations may derive from related facts or desires. For example, in Western culture opening an umbrella indoors might be considered unlucky partly because it could poke someone in the eye, whereas shaking hands with a chimney sweep might be considered lucky partly because it is a kind but unpleasant thing to do given the dirty nature of their work. In Chinese culture, the association of the number 4 as a homophone with the word for death may explain why it is considered unlucky. Extremely complicated and sometimes contradictory systems for prescribing auspicious and inauspicious times and arrangements of things have been devised, for example feng shui in Chinese culture and systems of astrology in various cultures around the world. Many polytheistic religions have specific gods or goddesses that are associated with luck, including Fortuna and Felicitas in the Ancient Roman religion (the former related to the words “fortunate” and “unfortunate” in English), Dedun in Nubian religion, the Seven Lucky Gods in Japanese mythology, mythical American serviceman John Frum in Polynesian cargo cults, and the inauspicious Alakshmi in Hinduism.

Just Our Luck - Bibliography - Netflix

Gunther, Max. “The Lucky Factor” Harriman House Ltd 1977. ISBN 9781906659950 Mlodinow, Leonard. “The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives” Penguin Group, 2008. ISBN 0375424040 Mauboussin, Michael. “The Success Equation: Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing.” Harvard Business Review Press, 2012 ISBN 9781422184233 Taleb, Nassim N. “Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets” Random House 2001 ISBN 0812975219

Just Our Luck - References - Netflix