Impractical Jokers: Inside Jokes packs classic, fan-favorite episodes of the show with sharable pop-up facts throughout. With behind-the-scenes stories and surprising factoids directly from the Jokers, this alternate version of existing content will give viewers a unique and unprecedented look behind the curtain.

Impractical Jokers: Inside Jokes - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2016-07-14

Impractical Jokers: Inside Jokes - Rosie O'Donnell - Netflix

Roseann O'Donnell (born March 21, 1962) is an American comedian, actress, author and television personality. She has been a magazine editor and continues to be a celebrity blogger, a lesbian rights activist, a television producer, and a collaborative partner in the LGBT family vacation company, R Family Vacations. O'Donnell started her comedy career while still a teenager. Her big break was on the talent show Star Search in 1984. After a TV sitcom and a series of movies introduced her to a larger national audience, she hosted The Rosie O'Donnell Show from 1996 to 2002, which won multiple Emmy Awards. During this time, she wrote her first memoir, Find Me, and developed the nickname “Queen of Nice”, as well as a reputation for philanthropic efforts. She used the book's $3 million advance to establish her For All Kids foundation and promote other charity projects, encouraging celebrities on her show to take part. In 1997, O'Donnell did the voice of Terk in the Disney animated film Tarzan. In 2002, two months before finishing her talk show run, O'Donnell came out, stating “I'm a dyke!” and saying that her primary reason was to bring attention to gay adoption issues. O'Donnell is a foster and adoptive mother. She was named The Advocate's 2002 Person of the Year; in May 2003, she became a regular contributor to the magazine. In 2006, O'Donnell became a moderator on The View. Her strong opinions resulted in some controversies, including an on-air dispute regarding the Bush administration's policies with the Iraq War, resulting in a mutual agreement to cancel her contract. In 2007, O'Donnell released her second memoir, Celebrity Detox, which focuses on her struggles with fame and her time at The View. From 2009 to 2011, she hosted Rosie Radio on Sirius XM Radio. In 2011, O'Donnell signed on with the OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network to return to daytime TV with The Rosie Show. On March 16, 2012, the network cancelled the show due to low ratings, and the last show aired on March 29, 2012. In July 2014, O'Donnell was rehired to join The View as a co-host for the series' eighteenth season. O'Donnell announced in February 2015 her decision to depart the series again, this time citing personal reasons for her departure. In November 2016, Showtime announced that O'Donnell had joined the cast of the comedy pilot SMILF, which premiered on November 5, 2017.

Impractical Jokers: Inside Jokes - 2006-2007: The View - Netflix

In September 2006, O'Donnell replaced Meredith Vieira as a co-host and moderator of The View, a daytime women-oriented talk show. Star Jones, a co-host on the show, quit, with some speculating Jones's conservative views would be in constant tension with O'Donnell's more liberal counterpoint. O'Donnell had also disputed Jones's route of rapid weight loss, alluding that it must have been through gastric bypass surgery, rather than dieting and exercise alone as Jones had insisted, which also fed speculation about certain tension between the two. (Jones later confirmed that surgery was involved.) O'Donnell is credited with keeping the show's “buzz factor up”. She is also credited with making it more news-focused, though it still embraced the “fluff” of daytime TV talk shows (celebrities, fashion, and food). Despite an overall downward trend for most daytime broadcast shows, ratings rose by 27% during O'Donnell's first year on The View. The show was the fourth-most-watched in all of daytime in the key demographic of women ages 18–49 and scored record ratings in the total viewer category with an average of 3.4 million viewers—up 15% versus the same time in 2005. O'Donnell moderated the opening “Hot Topics” portion of the show, where news items were discussed. O'Donnell gave the show a more political slant, and she and fellow comic Joy Behar often gave strong opinions against former President Bush's domestic and foreign policies, including the Iraq War. As a conservative counterpoint, Elisabeth Hasselbeck would usually support the Bush administration's policies and the two would get into an adversarial give-and-take. Encouraged by the show to be outspoken, O'Donnell sometimes provoked debate, at one time stating “radical Christianity is just as threatening as radical Islam.” On the February 24, 2003 episode of Phil Donahue's talk show, O'Donnell referred to the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic archdiocese of Boston resulting in $157 million awarded to 983 claimants, stating “I hope the Catholic Church gets sued until the end of time. Maybe, you know, we can melt down some of the gold toilets in the Pope's Vatican and pay off some of the lawsuits because, the whole tenet of living a Christ-like life, has been lost in Catholicism.” O'Donnell joked about communion rituals alongside co-host Behar's drunk priest comments. On April 19, 2007, the panel discussed the Supreme Court of the United States's ruling in Gonzales v. Carhart, a decision upholding the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act. O'Donnell cited a Florynce Kennedy quote, “If men could get pregnant abortion would be a sacrament” and asked rhetorically “How many Supreme Court judges are Catholic?” and “How about separation of church and state?” Some conservative commentators deemed her statements “anti-Catholic bigotry” and suggested that such statements against other religions would not be tolerated. O'Donnell's outspokenness and spontaneousness sometimes led to her views being recirculated by other media outlets, often surprising The View co-hosts including O'Donnell. Frequently portrayed unfavorably by conservative media outlets and what she deemed as Republican pundits, O'Donnell lamented that they were focusing on her comments instead of more important national and world issues. On December 5, 2006, O'Donnell used a series of ching chongs to imitate newscasters in China. Vanessa Hua of the San Francisco Chronicle expressed disappointment in O'Donnell, given the comedian's championing of LGBT rights. On December 14, O'Donnell apologized to those she offended, explaining that “Some people have told me it's as bad as the n-word. I was like, really? I didn't know that.” O'Donnell warned that “there's a good chance I'll do something like that again, probably in the next week, not on purpose. Only 'cause it's how my brain works.” Time called it a “pseudo-apology”. O'Donnell later wrote in Celebrity Detox that “I wish I had been a bit more pure in my public apology.” In December 2006, O'Donnell criticized Donald Trump for holding a press conference to reinstate Miss USA Tara Conner, who had violated pageant guidelines, accusing him of using her scandal to “generate publicity for the Miss USA Pageant” (to which he owns the rights) by announcing he was giving her a second chance. O'Donnell commented that due to Trump's multiple marital affairs and questionable business bankruptcies, he was not a moral authority for young people in America. She stated, “Left the first wife, had an affair. Left the second wife, had an affair – but he's the moral compass for 20-year-olds in America.” In response, Trump began a “vicious” mass media blitz in which he appeared on various television shows, either in person or by phone, threatening to sue O'Donnell (he never did). He called her names, threatened to take away her partner Kelli, and claimed that Barbara Walters regretted hiring her. Walters was stuck in the middle as a social acquaintance of Trump's, and said O'Donnell didn't feel like Walters defended her enough, which led to what both women agreed was an unfortunate confrontation in one of the dressing rooms. “I had pain and hurt and rejection,” O'Donnell said, “sometimes [my emotions] overwhelm me. Sometimes I get flooded.” Walters denied that she was unhappy with O'Donnell, saying, “I have never regretted, nor do I now, the hiring of Rosie O'Donnell.” On April 25, 2007, ABC announced that O'Donnell would be leaving the show before the end of the year because of a failure to reach agreement on a new contract. O'Donnell condemned many of the Bush administration's policies, especially the war in Iraq and the resulting occupation. She also questioned the official explanation for the destruction of the World Trade Center, and stating in one episode, “I do believe that it's the first time in history that fire has ever melted steel”. She consistently mentioned recent military deaths and news about the war, and criticized the U.S. media for its lack of attention to these issues compared to media coverage throughout the world. This led to a series of heated exchanges with co-host Hasselbeck, as well as “the most-discussed moment of her professional life.” On May 17, 2007, O'Donnell rhetorically asked, “655,000 Iraqi civilians dead. Who are the terrorists? ... if you were in Iraq and another country, the United States, the richest in the world, invaded your country and killed 655,000 of your citizens, what would you call us?” Conservative commentators criticized O'Donnell's statements, saying that she was comparing American soldiers to terrorists. On May 23, 2007, a heated discussion ensued, in part, because of what O'Donnell perceived as Elisabeth Hasselbeck's unwillingness to defend O'Donnell from the criticisms; O'Donnell asked Hasselbeck, “Do you believe I think our troops are terrorists?” Hasselbeck answered in the negative but also stated “Defend your own insinuations.” O'Donnell was hurt and felt Hasselbeck had betrayed her friendship: “there's something about somebody being different on TV toward you than they are in the dressing room. It didn't really ring true for me.” O'Donnell stated that Republican pundits were mischaracterising her statements and the right-wing media would portray her as a bully, attacking “innocent pure Christian Elisabeth” whenever they disagreed. O'Donnell decided to leave the show that day, but afterwards stated that the reason was not the argument itself, but rather the fact that she saw on the studio monitor that the camera had shown a split screen, with her and Hasselbeck on either side. O'Donnell felt that the show's director and producer “had to prepare that in advance [...] I felt there was setup egging me into that position. The executive producer and I did not gel.” O'Donnell and ABC agreed to cut short her contract agreement on May 25, 2007. ABC News reported that her arguments with Hasselbeck brought the show its best ratings ever. In May 2007, Time magazine included O'Donnell in their annual list of the 100 most influential people. O'Donnell was named “The Most Annoying Celebrity of 2007” by a PARADE reader's poll, in response she said, “Frankly, most celebrities are annoying ... and I suppose I am the most annoying, but, whatever.” In 2008, The View won an Emmy for “Outstanding Special Class Writing” for a specially themed Autism episode that O'Donnell helped create. Janette Barber, O'Donnell's longtime friend and producer/writer of The Rosie O'Donnell Show, accepted the award on behalf of herself and the other two winners, Christian McKiernan and Andrew Smith.

Impractical Jokers: Inside Jokes - References - Netflix