You don't have to be rich to live in Hawaii — you just have to want it, say the brokers at the Hawaii Life realty firm who make island-living dreams come true for clients ready to make it a reality. In Hawaii, properties range from \$50K plots of land to \$50 million-dollar dream homes, from Oahu to Kauai to the Big Island to Maui. The firm's 130+ brokers are unlikely real estate moguls, people who themselves have made the leap to the life in Hawaii, as they call it, and who want to see that others can enjoy it too. This half-hour real estate series will follow the firm's endless stream of clients who are abandoning their 9 to 5 lives in Anywhere, U.S.A., to take hold of a "Hawaii Life".

Hawaii Life - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2013-01-01

Hawaii Life - Kingdom of Hawaii - Netflix

The Kingdom of Hawaiʻi originated in 1795 with the unification of the independent islands of Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, Molokaʻi, and Lānaʻi under one government. In 1810 the whole Hawaiian archipelago became unified when Kauaʻi and Niʻihau joined the Kingdom of Hawai‘i voluntarily and without bloodshed or war. Two major dynastic families ruled the kingdom: the House of Kamehameha and the House of Kalākaua. The Kingdom won recognition from major European powers. The United States became its chief trading partner. The Kingdom was watched jealously by the United States against the possibility of another power (such as Britain or Japan) threatening to seize control. Hawaii adopted a new constitution in 1887 to reduce the absolute power of King Kalākaua. Queen Liliʻuokalani, who succeeded Kalākaua in 1891, tried to restore the old order, but was overthrown in 1893, largely at the hands of United States citizens. Hawaii became a republic until the United States annexed via joint resolution.

Hawaii Life - Economic, social, and cultural transformation - Netflix

Economic and demographic factors in the 19th century reshaped the islands. Their consolidation into one unified political entity led to international trade. Under Kamehameha (1810-1819), sandalwood was exported to China. That led to the introduction of money and trade throughout the islands. Following Kamehameha's death the succession was overseen by his principal wife, Ka'ahumanu, who was designated as regent over the new king, Liholiho, who was a minor. Queen Ka'ahumanu eliminated various prohibitions (kapu) governing women's behavior. They included men and women eating together and women eating bananas. She also overturned the old religion as the Christian missionaries arrived in the islands. The main contribution of the missionaries was to develop a written Hawaiian language. That led to very high levels of literacy in Hawaii, above 90 percent in the latter half of the 19th century. The development of writing aided in the consolidation of government. Written constitutions enumerating the power and duties of the King were developed. In 1848, the Great Māhele was promulgated by the king. It instituted formal property rights to the land. It followed the customary control of the land prior to this declaration. Ninety-eight percent of the land was assigned to the Ali'i, chiefs or nobles. Two percent went to the commoners. No land could be sold, only transferred to lineal descendant land manager. For the natives, contact with the outer world represented demographic disaster, as a series of unfamiliar diseases such as smallpox decimated the natives. The Hawaiian population of natives fell from approximately 128,000 in 1778 to 71,000 in 1853 and kept declining to 24,000 in 1920. Most lived in remote villages. American missionaries converted most of the natives to Christianity. The missionaries and their children became a powerful elite into the mid-19th century. They provided the chief advisors and cabinet members of the kings and dominated the professional and merchant class in the cities. The elites promoted the sugar industry in order to modernize Hawaii's economy. American capital set up a series of plantations after 1850. Few natives were willing to work on the sugar plantations and so recruiters fanned out across Asia and Europe. As a result, between 1850 and 1900 some 200,000 contract laborers from China, Japan, the Philippines, Portugal and elsewhere came to Hawaii under fixed term contracts (typically for five years). Most returned home on schedule, but large numbers stayed permanently. By 1908 about 180,000 Japanese workers had arrived. No more were allowed in, but 54,000 remained permanently.

Hawaii Life - References - Netflix