This series features an unsuspecting mark, whose fears come to life before their eyes with elaborate special effects, intricate makeup, twisted actors and multiple cameras capturing the scenario from every angle. Every frighteningly hilarious prank is deviously tailored with help from the victim's friends and family to turn an everyday situation into someone's scary moment, until they realize they've been pranked.

Freak Out - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2014-10-21

Freak Out - Freak Out! - Netflix

Freak Out! is the debut studio album by the American rock band the Mothers of Invention, released June 27, 1966, on Verve Records. Often cited as one of rock music's first concept albums, the album is a satirical expression of frontman Frank Zappa's perception of American pop culture and the nascent freak scene of Los Angeles. It was also one of the earliest double albums in rock music (Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde was originally scheduled to precede it by a week, but its release was delayed until more than a month later), and the first 2-record debut. In the UK the album was originally released as an edited single disc. The album was produced by Tom Wilson, who signed The Mothers, formerly a bar band called the Soul Giants. Zappa said many years later that Wilson signed the group to a record deal in the belief that they were a white blues band. The album features Zappa on vocals and guitar, along with lead vocalist/tambourine player Ray Collins, bass player/vocalist Roy Estrada, drummer/vocalist Jimmy Carl Black and guitar player Elliot Ingber (later of Captain Beefheart's Magic Band, performing there under the pseudonym “Winged Eel Fingerling”). The band's original repertoire consisted of rhythm and blues covers, but after Zappa joined the band he encouraged them to play his own original material, and the name was changed to The Mothers. The musical content of Freak Out! ranges from rhythm and blues, doo-wop and standard blues-influenced rock to orchestral arrangements and avant-garde sound collages. Although the album was initially poorly received in the United States, it was a success in Europe. It gained a cult following in America, where it continued to sell in substantial quantities until it was discontinued in the early 1970s. In 1999, the album was honored with the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, and in 2003, Rolling Stone ranked it among the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. In 2006, The MOFO Project/Object, an audio documentary on the making of the album, was released in honor of its 40th anniversary. In Europe, the album was released as one record with a slightly edited track list.

Freak Out - Background - Netflix

In the early 1960s, Zappa met Ray Collins. Collins supported himself by working as a carpenter, and on weekends sang with a group called the Soul Giants. Collins got into a fight with their guitar player, who quit, leaving the band in need of a substitute, and Zappa filled in. The Soul Giants' repertoire originally consisted of R&B covers; though after Zappa joined the band he encouraged them to play his own original material and try to get a record contract. While most of the band members liked the idea, then-leader and saxophone player Davy Coronado felt that performing original material would cost them bookings, and quit the band. The Soul Giants became the Mothers and Zappa took over leadership of the band. The group moved to Los Angeles in early 1965 after Zappa got them a management contract with Herb Cohen. They gained steady work at clubs along the Sunset Strip. MGM staff producer Tom Wilson offered the band a record deal with the Verve Records division in early 1966. He had heard of their growing reputation but had seen them perform only one song, “Trouble Every Day”, which concerned the Watts riots. According to Zappa, this led Wilson to believe that they were a “white blues band”.

Freak Out - References - Netflix