After enduring both business and family upheavals, a ruthless investment director has a heart transplant and finds a new way to look at life and love.

Falling for Innocence - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Korean

Status: Ended

Runtime: 65 minutes

Premier: 2015-04-03

Falling for Innocence - Presumption of innocence - Netflix

The presumption of innocence is the principle that one is considered innocent unless proven guilty. It was traditionally expressed by the Latin maxim ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat (“the burden of proof is on the one who declares, not on one who denies”). In many states, presumption of innocence is a legal right of the accused in a criminal trial, and it is an international human right under the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 11. Under the presumption of innocence, the legal burden of proof is thus on the prosecution, which must collect and present compelling evidence to the trier of fact. The trier of fact (a judge or a jury) is thus restrained and ordered by law to consider only actual evidence and testimony presented in court. The prosecution must, in most cases prove that the accused is guilty beyond reasonable doubt. If reasonable doubt remains, the accused must be acquitted. Under the Justinian Codes and English common law, the accused is presumed innocent in criminal proceedings, and in civil proceedings (like breach of contract) both sides must issue proof.

Falling for Innocence - The fundamental right - Netflix

This right is so important in modern democracies, constitutional monarchies and republics that many have explicitly included it in their legal codes and constitutions: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, article 11, states: “Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence.”. The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of the Council of Europe says (art. 6.2): “Everyone charged with a criminal offence shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law”. This convention has been adopted by treaty and is binding on all Council of Europe members. Currently (and in any foreseeable expansion of the EU) every country member of the European Union is also member to the Council of Europe, so this stands for EU members as a matter of course. Nevertheless, this assertion is iterated verbatim in Article 48 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. In Canada, section 11(d) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states: “Any person charged with an offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty according to law in a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal”. In the Colombian constitution, Title II, Chapter 1, Article 29 states that “Every person is presumed innocent until proven guilty according to the law”. In France, article 9 of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen 1789, which has force as constitutional law, begins: “Any man being presumed innocent until he has been declared guilty ...”. The Code of Criminal Procedure states in its preliminary article that “any person suspected or prosecuted is presumed innocent for as long as their guilt has not been established” and the jurors' oath repeats this assertion (article 304). However, there exists a popular misconception that under French law, the accused is presumed guilty until proven innocent. In Iran, Article 37 of the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran states: “Innocence is to be presumed, and no one is to be held guilty of a charge unless his or her guilt has been established by a competent court”. In Italy, the second paragraph of Article 27 of the Constitution states: “A defendant shall be considered not guilty until a final sentence has been passed.” In Romania, article 23 of the Constitution states that “any person shall be presumed innocent until found guilty by a final decision of the court.” The Constitution of Russia, in article 49, states that “Everyone charged with a crime shall be considered not guilty until his or her guilt has been proven in conformity with the federal law and has been established by the valid sentence of a court of law”. It also states that “The defendant shall not be obliged to prove his or her innocence” and “Any reasonable doubt shall be interpreted in favor of the defendant”. In the South African Constitution, section 35(3)(h) of the Bill of Rights states: “Every accused person has a right to a fair trial, which includes the right to be presumed innocent, to remain silent, and not to testify during the proceedings.” Although the Constitution of the United States does not cite it explicitly, presumption of innocence is widely held to follow from the 5th, 6th, and 14th amendments. The case of Coffin v. United States (1895) established the presumption of innocence of persons accused of crimes. See also In re Winship. In New Zealand, the New Zealand Bill of Rights 1990 provides inter alia at section 25 (c) “Everyone who is charged with an offence has, in relation to the determination of the charge, the following minimum rights: (c) the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to law”

Falling for Innocence - References - Netflix