Driving Test is a heartfelt factual show that goes behind the scenes of people learning how to drive. From their very first lesson to the test itself, we'll witness the highs and lows and the hits and misses as the drivers and their larger-than-life instructors score them a Pass or Fail. Set in Darwin, the only place in Australia where the driving test must be recorded, we meet people from all walks of life as they're unleashed on the streets. They set off on the ride of their lives hoping to secure the ticket of their dreams – a driver's licence.

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: None

Driving Test - Driver's license - Netflix

A driver's license is an official document permitting a specific individual to operate one or more types of motorized vehicles, such as a motorcycle, car, truck, or bus on a public road. The term driver's license is American English; the Canadian English equivalent is driver's licence, and in British English it is driving licence. In this article, the American terminology and spelling is used except where the section refers specifically to British practice. The laws relating to the licensing of drivers vary between jurisdictions. In some jurisdictions, a license is issued after the recipient has passed a driving test, while in others, a person acquires a license before beginning to drive. Different categories of license often exist for different types of motor vehicles, particularly large trucks and passenger vehicles. The difficulty of the driving test varies considerably between jurisdictions, as do factors such as age and the required level of practice. In some international agreements the wording driver's permit is used, for instance in the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic.

Driving Test - History - Netflix

In 1968, the Convention on road traffic, ratified in 1977, further updated these agreements. Other countries in Europe also introduced driving tests during the twentieth century, the last of them being Belgium where, until 1977, it was possible to purchase and hold a license without having to undergo a driving test. As automobile-related fatalities soared in North America, public outcry provoked legislators to begin studying the French and German statutes as models. On August 1, 1910, North America's first licensing law for motor vehicles went into effect in the US state of New York, though it initially applied only to professional chauffeurs. In July 1913, the state of New Jersey became the first to require all drivers to pass a mandatory examination before receiving a license.

Karl Benz, inventor of the modern automobile, had to receive written permission from the Grand Ducal authorities to operate his car on public roads in 1888 after residents complained about the noise and smell of his Motorwagen. Up until the start of the 20th century, European authorities issued licenses to drive motor vehicles similarly ad hoc, if at all. Mandatory licensing for drivers came into force on 1 January 1904 after the Motor Car Act 1903 received royal assent in the United Kingdom. Every car owner had to register their vehicle with their local government authority and be able to prove registration of their vehicle on request. The minimum qualifying age was set at 17. The licence gave its holder 'freedom of the road' with a maximum 20 mph (32 km/h) speed limit. Compulsory testing was introduced in 1934, with the passing of the Road Traffic Act. Prussia, then a state within the German Empire, introduced compulsory licensing on September 29, 1903. A test on mechanical aptitude had to be passed and the Dampfkesselüberwachungsverein (“steam boiler supervision association”) was charged with conducting these tests. In 1910, the German imperial government mandated the licensing of drivers on a national scale, establishing a system of tests and driver's education requirements that was adopted in other countries. In 1909, the Convention with Respect to the International Circulation of Motor Vehicles recognize the need of qualifications, examination, and authorization for international driving. In 1929, the notion of International Driving Permit is addressed by international Convention. In 1949, the United Nations defined a convention on road traffic that standardised rules on roads, occupants, rules, signs, driver's licenses and such. It address the notion of driving license for a number of countries, under the wording “driving permit” and declares that its color should be pink.

Driving Test - References - Netflix