Emmy-winning journalist Charlie Rose highlights some of the best stories and most-interesting interviews of the week in this half-hour series, Charlie Rose: The Week. Drawing on conversations from his nightly PBS program "Charlie Rose,'' each weekly episode also features previews of the week ahead -- with regard to news in politics, business, culture and the arts. Rose has appeared Monday nights through Friday nights on PBS across the country since 1993.

Charlie Rose: The Week - Netflix

Type: Talk Show

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2013-07-19

Charlie Rose: The Week - Pete Rose - Netflix

Peter Edward Rose Sr. (born April 14, 1941), also known by his nickname “Charlie Hustle”, is an American former professional baseball player and manager. Rose played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1963 to 1986, and managed from 1984 to 1989. Rose was a switch hitter and is the all-time MLB leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053), singles (3,215), and outs (10,328). He won three World Series rings, three batting titles, one Most Valuable Player Award, two Gold Gloves, and the Rookie of the Year Award, and also made 17 All-Star appearances at an unequaled five positions (second baseman, left fielder, right fielder, third baseman, and first baseman). Rose won both of his Gold Gloves when he was an outfielder, in 1969 and 1970. In August 1989 (his last year as a manager and three years after retiring as a player), Rose was penalized with permanent ineligibility from baseball amidst accusations that he gambled on baseball games while he played for and managed the Reds; the charges of wrongdoing included claims that he bet on his own team. In 1991, the Baseball Hall of Fame formally voted to ban those on the “permanently ineligible” list from induction, after previously excluding such players by informal agreement among voters. After years of public denial, Rose admitted in 2004 that he bet on baseball and on the Reds. The issue of Rose's possible reinstatement and election to the Hall of Fame remains contentious throughout baseball. On June 22, 2015, ESPN concluded its own investigation of Rose and determined that he had bet on baseball while still a player–manager from 1984 to 1986. The results of the investigation were made public and revealed the records of bets that Rose had made on baseball. U.S. federal authorities had seized the records from one of Rose's associates.

Charlie Rose: The Week - MLB All-Century Team - Netflix

In 1999, Rose was selected as an outfielder on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. To select the team, a panel of experts first compiled a list of the 100 greatest players from the past century. Fans then voted on the players using paper and online ballots. An exception was made to his ban to allow him to participate in the pre-game introduction of the All-Century team before Game 2 of the 1999 World Series between the Braves and Yankees. Despite never having been a member of the Braves, Rose received the loudest ovation of the All-Century team members from the crowd at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia. After the ceremony on live television, NBC's Jim Gray repeatedly asked Rose if he was ready to admit to betting on baseball and apologize. Many people were outraged over Gray's aggressive questioning, feeling that it detracted from the ceremony. In protest, Yankees outfielder Chad Curtis refused to speak with Gray after his game-winning home run in Game 3. Earlier that season, Rose had been ranked at number 25 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players. In 2002, Rose again appeared during the 2002 World Series in a Master Card-sponsored event recalling “Baseball's Most Memorable Moments.” Fans voted Rose's record-breaking hit over Ty Cobb as the 6th most memorable moment in baseball history. While allowing him to participate in the All-Century Team, and a September 2010 celebration at Great American Ball Park of the 25th anniversary of Rose's 4,192nd hit, MLB has refused to allow him to participate in other events in Cincinnati, such as the 25th anniversary reunion of the Big Red Machine, the closing of Cinergy Field, and the opening of Great American Ball Park, as well as the closing of Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia and 1980 Phillies anniversary celebrations. Since assuming office, Commissioner Manfred has taken a more relaxed attitude compared to Selig with respect to participation by Rose in MLB events that cannot influence play.

Charlie Rose: The Week - References - Netflix