Cat's Eye is the most notorious group of art thieves in Japan. No one knows their identities, but for most of Tokyo, the mystery only heightens their allure. To bumbling detective Utsumi Toshio, Cat's Eye is a colossal pain in the neck. They outwit him and the rest of the police at every turn, making them look ridiculous. He would never dream of being in love with someone in Cat's Eye. Except he already is. Toshio has no idea that Cat's Eye is actually his girlfriend, Hitomi Kisugi, and her sisters Rui and Ai. Running the Cat's Eye Cafe next door to the police station, they bring ''hiding in plain sight'' to a whole new level. But thievery and romance are difficult to balance. Hitomi will need all the help she can get to stop Toshio from discovering her identity - especially when he starts having feelings for her alter-ego!

Cat's Eye - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1983-04-11

Cat's Eye - Chatoyancy - Netflix

In gemology, chatoyancy ( shə-TOY-ən-see), or chatoyance or cat's eye effect, is an optical reflectance effect seen in certain gemstones. Coined from the French “œil de chat”, meaning “cat's eye”, chatoyancy arises either from the fibrous structure of a material, as in tiger's eye quartz, or from fibrous inclusions or cavities within the stone, as in cat's eye chrysoberyl. The precipitates that cause chatoyance in chrysoberyl are the mineral rutile, composed mostly of titanium dioxide. Examined samples have yielded no evidence of tubes or fibres. The rutile precipitates all align perpendicularly with respect to cat's eye effect. It is reasoned that the lattice parameter of the rutile matches only one of the three orthorhombic crystal axes of the chrysoberyl, resulting in preferred alignment along that direction.

The effect can be likened to the sheen off a spool of silk: The luminous streak of reflected light is always perpendicular to the direction of the fibres. For a gemstone to show this effect best it must be cut en cabochon (rounded with a flat base rather than faceted), with the fibers or fibrous structures parallel to the base of the finished gem. The best finished specimens show a single sharply defined band of light that moves across the stone when it is rotated. Chatoyant stones of lesser quality display a banded effect as is typical with cat's-eye varieties of quartz. Faceted stones do not show the effect well. Gem species known for this phenomenon include the aforementioned quartz, chrysoberyl, beryl (especially var. aquamarine), charoite, tourmaline, labradorite, selenite, feldspar, apatite, moonstone, thomsonite and scapolite amongst others. Glass optical cable can also display chatoyancy if properly cut, and has become a popular decorative material in a variety of vivid colors. The term “cat's eye”, when used by itself as the name of a gemstone, refers to a cat's eye chrysoberyl. It is also used as an adjective which indicates the chatoyance phenomenon in another stone, e.g., cat's eye aquamarine.

Cat's Eye - See also - Netflix

Asterism (gemology) Optical phenomenon

Cat's Eye - References - Netflix