Radio host, television star and internet provocateur Charlamagne Tha God, and co-host Raymond Braun, will give everything they've got to stop internet trolls, the most pervasive and consistent troublemakers online. Using the "Catfish" brand of investigating the truth, Catfish: Trolls unmasks the internet's most vocal trolls to drag them out of hiding and into the light.

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Catfish: Trolls - Trolling (fishing) - Netflix

Trolling is a method of fishing where one or more fishing lines, baited with lures or bait fish, are drawn through the water. This may be behind a moving boat, or by slowly winding the line in when fishing from a static position, or even sweeping the line from side-to-side, e.g. when fishing from a jetty. Trolling is used to catch pelagic fish such as salmon, mackerel and kingfish. Trolling can be phonetically confused with trawling, a different method of fishing where a net (trawl) is drawn through the water instead of lines. Trolling is used both for recreational and commercial fishing whereas trawling is used mainly for commercial fishing. Trolling from a moving boat involves moving quite slowly through the water. This can be accomplished with the use of a special trolling motor. Multiple lines are often used, and outriggers can be used to spread the lines more widely and reduce their chances of tangling. Downriggers can also be used to keep the lures or baits trailing at a desired depth.

Catfish: Trolls - Baits and lures - Netflix

To be effective, trolling baits and lures must have the visual ability to attract fish and intrigue them with the way they move through the water. Most trolling lures are designed to look and behave like dying, injured, or fast moving fish. They include: Surface lures, also known as top water lures. They float and resemble prey that is on top of the water. They can make a popping sound from a concave-cut head, a burbling sound from “side fins” or scoops or a buzzing commotion from one or several propellers. Plugs are also known as crankbaits. These lures have a fishlike body shape and as they troll through the water they make various movements caused by instability due to a scoop under their heads. Swimbait, a minnow-like soft plastic bait that is reeled like a plug. Some have swimming tails. Spoon lures resemble the inside of a table spoon. They flash in the light while randomly wobbling or darting due to their shape. Spinnerbait, pieces of wire bent at about a 60 degree angle with a hook on the lower end and a flashy spinner mechanism on the upper end. Trolling baits and lures are either tied with a knot, such as the improved clinch knot, or connected with a tiny safety pin-like device called a “snap” onto the fishing line which is in turn connected to the reel. The reel is attached to a rod. The motion is of the lure is made by winding line back on to the reel, by sweeping the fishing rod, jigging movements with the fishing rod, or by trolling behind a moving boat. Lures can be contrasted with artificial flies, commonly called flies by fly fishers, which either float on the water surface, slowly sink or float underwater, in imitation some form of insect fish food. However some flies, such as the trolling tandem streamer fly, are designed for trolling behind a moving boat. As an example, marlin lures are typically 7-14 inches or more long with a shaped plastic or metal head and a plastic skirt. The design of the lure head, particularly its face, gives the lure its individual action when trolled through the water. Lure actions range from an active side-to-side swimming pattern to pushing water aggressively on the surface to, most commonly, tracking along in a straight line with a regular surface pop and bubble trail. Besides the shape, weight and size of the lure head, the length and thickness of skirting, the number and size of hooks and the length and size of the leader used in lure rigging all influence the action of the lure: how actively it will run and how it will respond to different sea conditions. Experienced anglers fine tune their lures to get the action they want. Specialized lures made specifically for trolling swordfish use plastic glow sticks. A pattern of four or more lures can be trolled at varying distances behind the boat. Lures may be fished either straight from the rod tip (“flat lines”), or from outriggers. In addition to attaching a lure to the fishing line, an oval piece of metal (often hammered or curved for reflective purposes) called a dodger is often used to attract fish from greater distances. Lures designed for trolling with downriggers include metal “spoons” that are often decorated with colour tape, and plastic or rubber “squids” with various colours. A daisy chain is a chain of plastic lures which have no hooks. Their purpose is to function as teasers which attract a school of fish closer to the lures that do have hooks.

Catfish: Trolls - References - Netflix