Bettys Diagnose - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: German

Status: Running

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2015-01-09

Bettys Diagnose - Betty Ford - Netflix

Elizabeth Anne “Betty” Ford (née Bloomer; April 8, 1918 – July 8, 2011) was the First Lady of the United States from 1974 to 1977, as the wife of the 38th President of the United States, Gerald Ford. As First Lady, she was active in social policy and created precedents as a politically active presidential wife. Ford also served as the Second Lady of the United States from 1973 to 1974. Throughout her husband's term in office, she maintained high approval ratings despite opposition from some conservative Republicans who objected to her more moderate and liberal positions on social issues. Ford was noted for raising breast cancer awareness following her 1974 mastectomy. In addition, she was a passionate supporter of, and activist for, the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). Pro-choice on abortion and a leader in the Women's Movement, she gained fame as one of the most candid first ladies in history, commenting on every hot-button issue of the time, including feminism, equal pay, the Equal Rights Amendment, sex, drugs, abortion, and gun control. She also raised awareness of addiction when in the 1970s, she announced her long-running battle with alcoholism and substance abuse, being the first First Lady to do so. Following her White House years, she continued to lobby for the ERA and remained active in the feminist movement. She was the founder, and served as the first chair of the board of directors, of the Betty Ford Center for substance abuse and addiction. She was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal (co-presentation with her husband on October 21, 1998) and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (presented 1991 by George H. W. Bush).

Bettys Diagnose - National power, influence, and candor - Netflix

Reporters wondered what kind of first lady Ford would be, as they thought her predecessor, Pat Nixon, as noted by one reporter, to be the “most disciplined, composed first lady in history.” In the opinion of The New York Times and several presidential historians, “Mrs. Ford's impact on American culture may be far wider and more lasting than that of her husband, who served a mere 896 days, much of it spent trying to restore the dignity of the office of the president.” Steinhauer of The New York Times described Ford as “a product and symbol of the cultural and political times — doing the Bump dance along the corridors of the White House, donning a mood ring, chatting on her CB radio with the handle First Mama — a housewife who argued passionately for equal rights for women, a mother of four who mused about drugs, abortion and premarital sex aloud and without regret.” In 1975, in an interview with McCall's, Ford said that she was asked just about everything, except for how often she and the president had sex. “And if they'd asked me that I would have told them,” she said, adding that her response would be, “As often as possible.”

She was open about the benefits of psychiatric treatment, and spoke understandingly about marijuana use and premarital sex. The new First Lady noted during a televised White House tour that she and the President shared the same bed. Ford was a guest on 60 Minutes and, in a characteristically candid interview, she discussed how she would counsel her daughter if she was having an affair. She said she “would not be surprised” by that, and also acknowledged that her children may have experimented with marijuana, which was popular among the young. Some conservatives called her “No Lady” for her comments and demanded her “resignation”, but her overall approval rating was at a high seventy-five percent. As she later said, during her husband's failed 1976 presidential campaign, “I would give my life to have Jerry have my poll numbers.” Her outspoken comments also caused President Ford's advisors dismay due to their attempts at restoring America's composure in the wake of Watergate.

Bettys Diagnose - References - Netflix