Marriage is thought to be the final conclusion of love: the most precious value in this world. But in reality, the marriage is not so sweet as recklessly imagined. Instead of being a sweet dream, the marriage in reality is a commitment and a promise to live among many kinds of obligation and sacrifice. It is rather the end of love than a sweet beginning. This is not what the lovers are aiming about. It's not marriage but living love they are shooting for. This is a drama of couple who has found a new way of living happily in love.

Attic Cat - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Korean

Status: Ended

Runtime: 65 minutes

Premier: 2003-06-02

Attic Cat - Black Cat, White Cat - Netflix

Black Cat, White Cat (Serbian: Црна мачка, бели мачор; Crna mačka, beli mačor) is a 1998 Serbian romantic comedy film directed by Emir Kusturica. It won the Silver Lion for Best Direction at the Venice Film Festival. The literal translation of the title is actually “Black cat, white tomcat”. The movie characters speak in Romani, Serbian, and Bulgarian - frequently switching among them.

Attic Cat - Reception - Netflix

Black Cat, White Cat received a positive response from critics, garnering an 85% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 34 reviews with an average score of 7/10. Janet Maslin of The New York Times wrote a positive review, summing the film up as “a mad scramble through the Felliniesque realm of Mr. Kusturica's imagination”. She further praised Srdjan Todorovic's portrayal of Dadan Karambolo as “a repetitive but irresistible turn” before concluding that “Mr. Kusturica so evidently adores all of the film's other characters that Black Cat, White Cat becomes a wild, warts-and-all celebration of their lives and like Fellini, Kusturica finds true grace where it's least expected and makes films utterly, uncompromisingly his own”. In his review for the Los Angeles Times, Kevin Thomas refers to the film as a “raucous, knockabout comedy, a paean to love, freedom and friendship”, before concluding that despite being two hours and nine minutes long, Black Cat, White Cat “gets away with it better than most over-long movies due to its beguiling rambling shaggy dog-story quality.” In a generally positive review, J. Hoberman of The Village Voice refers to the film as “bravura moviemaking by any objective standard” and a “vehicle for the director's lowdown magic-realist fantasies about Romany gangsters, which has a velocity that belies its jerry-built mise-en-scène” concluding that “Black Cat, White Cat is determined to twist every character into an ideogram for vulgar humanity” while wondering if “these gypsies are a screen on which the Bosnian-born director can project his own feelings of ostracism and homelessness”. Salon's Andrew O'Hehir wrote a positive review, describing the film as “manic, carnivalesque, and treating death as a minor (and temporary) inconvenience” and commends “Kusturica's convincing portrayal of his homeland as a social and architectural ruin, where everything is either falling apart or overbuilt in misbegotten grandiosity”. O'Hehir concludes with “Kusturica strikes a half-ironic tone throughout this overcrowded, cacophonous masterpiece that’s almost impossible to categorize. In the tradition of Eastern European film, he’s satirizing the conventions of rural magic realism at least as much as he’s embracing them. But there’s nothing cynical or cold-hearted about Black Cat, White Cat. Like the waves of geese, pigs, goats, dogs and cats that sometimes threaten to overwhelm the human characters, it is recklessly, indescribably alive”. Peter Stack of the San Francisco Chronicle praised the film's characters who “whether freakish or treacherous, come up wonderfully human.” Web critic James Berardinelli praised the film as “something fresh and vibrant in an era when something as idiotic as Armageddon is the top-grossing movie of 1998 and films generally follow safe, comfortable patterns because that's what the studios' research shows that audiences want”. He commended the film's “earthy feel as well as its charm that lies in it lacking the polished glaze of most big budget features although being expertly filmed”, praised the performances of Bajram Severdzan and Branka Katic, and concluded that “while not a masterpiece, Kusturica's latest film is a real treat for those in search of a healthy dose of laughter set in a culture whose intricacies are rarely captured on film.”

Attic Cat - References - Netflix