Colourful adventures of a group of birds as they learn about social responsibility.

3rd and Bird - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 15 minutes

Premier: 2008-07-01

3rd and Bird - Larry Bird - Netflix

Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American professional basketball executive, former coach and former player, most recently serving as president of the Indiana Pacers in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Since retiring as a player for the Boston Celtics, he was a mainstay in the Indiana Pacers organization, but stepped down from the position of president following the first-round of the 2017 Eastern Conference playoffs. He has been described as one of the greatest basketball players of all time. Drafted into the NBA sixth overall by the Boston Celtics in 1978, Bird started at small forward and power forward for thirteen seasons, spearheading one of the NBA's most formidable frontcourts that included center Robert Parish and power forward Kevin McHale. Bird was a 12-time NBA All-Star and was named the league's Most Valuable Player (MVP) three consecutive times (1984–1986). He played his entire professional career for Boston, winning three NBA championships and two NBA Finals MVP awards. He was a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team (“The Dream Team”) that won the gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics. Bird was voted to the NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team in 1996 and inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1998 (and was inducted again in 2010 as a member of the “Dream Team”). He served as head coach of the Indiana Pacers from 1997 to 2000. In 2003, he assumed the role of President of Basketball Operations for the Pacers, holding the position until retiring in 2012. After a year away from the position, he announced he would return to the Pacers as president of basketball operations in 2013. In addition to being part of the 50–40–90 club, he is the only person in NBA history to be named Rookie of the Year, Regular Season MVP, Finals MVP, All-Star MVP, Coach of the Year, and Executive of the Year.

3rd and Bird - Player profile - Netflix

Bird, a wing who played the small forward and power forward positions, was nominated to twelve All-Star teams. He won two NBA Finals MVP and three regular-season MVP awards, all consecutively, a feat only equaled by Bill Russell and Wilt Chamberlain. Bird possessed an uncanny and unparalleled ability to anticipate and react to the strategies of his opponents. His talent for recognizing the moves of opponents and teammates prompted his first coach with the Celtics, Bill Fitch, to nickname him “Kodak”, because he seemed to formulate mental pictures of every play that took place on the court. Bird scored 24.3 points per game in his career on a .496 field goal average, an .886 free throw average (9th best all-time) and a 37.6 percentage on three-point shots. Bird had an average of 10.0 rebounds per game for his career and 6.3 assists. His multidimensional game made him a consistent triple-double threat; Bird currently ranks seventh all-time in triple-doubles with 59, not including the 10 he recorded in the playoffs. Bird's lifetime player efficiency rating (PER) is 23.5, 18th all-time. Additionally, he is the only 20, 10, 5 player in NBA history (points, rebounds, assists per game) with a lifetime PRA rating (points + rebounds + assists per game) of 40.6, which is 8th all-time. Bird was the first player in NBA history to shoot 50% or better on field goals, 40% on three-pointers, and 90% on free-throws in a single NBA season while achieving the league minimum for makes in each category. Bird accomplished this feat twice and is second only to Steve Nash for seasons in the 50–40–90 club. Bird is also remembered as an excellent defender. While he was neither fast nor quick-footed, and could not always shut down an individual player one-on-one, he consistently displayed a knack for anticipating the moves of his opponent, allowing him to intercept passes and create turnovers. His 1,556 career steals ranks 34th all-time. Unspectacular but effective defensive moves, such as jumping into a passing lane to make a steal or allowing his man to step past and drive to the hoop, then blocking the opponent's shot from behind, were staples of Bird's defensive game. In recognition of his defensive abilities, Bird was named to three All-Defensive Second Teams. Bird's humble roots were the source of his most frequently used moniker, “The Hick from French Lick”. Other observers called him “The Great White Hope”. He has also acquired the nickname “Larry Legend”.

3rd and Bird - References - Netflix